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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I was wondering about the chance of an Engine Block Crack occurring on my 2006 R18 engine with 160k miles.

it gets religiously serviced through me, and all i need to do to it is suspension work, which is a complete front strut, rear shocks, and rear upper control arms. I also need a OEM Upstream o2 Sensor as the car is running strange with an aftermarket o2 sensor.

Can you guys tell me if its worth putting more money on this car? i need this car to work 100% since i will be commuting to college, and can't deal with this engine defect. I will be saving up and buying a E90 328i since i've had an eye on it for a year.

Either way, i'll have an Emergency Fund just in case.

(2006 Honda Civic Sedan EX 1.8l R18)
 

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I had the same question about my 2008 EX. Seems the mileages when a crack occurred are all over the place, anywhere from 30K to 240K miles. REAL helpful. Nothing seems to indicate the likelihood of any one 8th gen civic actually suffering this.
I have learned this much from minor research -
If the engine block does crack, one likely spot is in front of the engine to the left of the catalytic converter, so in can be seen. There may be other spots. If your car is not loosing antifreeze and you do not smell it or see puddles on the ground, your block is probably still good.

If the check engine light is on, have some parts shop scan the codes or just get an inexpensive scanner and pull the codes. I imagine you already knew that. A cracked block alone won't set codes.

When you say the car is running strange, how so exactly?

Also, please don't take this wrong but before buying the BMW, do plenty of research first. Some of the BMW owners I have talked to say they are not all they are cracked up to be and that parts/service are really expensive.

If the block does crack on the 06 civic, it would probably not be worth fixing, especially if you are trying to save for something else.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. I'm just going to hope for the best that it doesn’t crack on me. I would atleast want this car to reach 200k miles until the engine goes.

For the BMW, i have researched this exact model for a full year, and it isn't too bad since i can DIY it. If anything, i will probably save up for a back-up car just in case.
 

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Once you get the BMW, the civic could be a backup.
If you are looking for a backup car while driving the Civic, might I recommend a Toyota Corolla. I have a 1995 with 5 speed manual and though it is far from "luxury", it just doesn't die.

ONE thing also, if you research cars, look on carcomplaints.com to get an idea of the common problems.
Keep in mind that the number of complaints correlates to how many were sold and the age. The civic had several thousand complaints BUT they sold maybe millions in recent years?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh, and for the car running strange:

When the Upstream o2 Sensor was bad, i put a new aftermarket one from Autozone. After the installation, the car doesn’t accelerate like before. Idk why.

Im planning to buy a new Genuine Honda Sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh, I forgot to mention that the 328i is the toy car (Weekend car) and I really won’t use it for daily driving.

ill still be thinking about getting another car as a backup.
 

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I do not believe an O2 sensor would have a noticeable effect on performance. Maybe investigate that before spending the cash on a Honda sensor, you know oem parts cost a fortune.

If you disconnected the battery when replacing the O2 sensor, is it possible the car just has to go through a re-learn phase? Supposedly that is a thing, I am not sure how different a car would perform during that phase.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I will have to investigate. Maybe it just needs a Valve Adjustment since its never been touched at 160k (Thats what i think). Im fearing i might have to do a pressure test to check for worn Piston Rings.

I need to do the Valve Cover Gasket either way since i'm down there.
 

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Sad that this is even a concern for Honda owners. If this were a GM forum, it would be like, "Of course the engine is going to blow up, what do you expect?" but with Hondas, we shouldn't be having to have this discussion.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
lmao true. This issue should be a recall for all affected blocks, but Honda said "**** You" after the 10 year warranty. Ashamed of them.
 

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I have a 2007 EX with 175k miles on it. The engine block just cracked due to the water pump going out and the engine overheating. The R18 was good to me. Only other problem were the gaskets leaking from the power steering but the actual mechanics of the power steering were still functional.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I better start saving up for an emergency fund now. I don't think i'm going to going to fix the small suspension flaws just to save money.

I guess i'll save up for a rainy day. What did you do to your car after the failure?
 

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In another thread, I was reding through some of it,
Your R18, how many miles do you have? I just linked from the page I was on, no other reason for page 4.

Seems some have gone way over 160K without the engine blowing. So there is a good chance we won't have to deal with that any time soon.

In any case, it is better than some car brands where people have complaints like needing a new engine or trans but the car has less than 30K.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So would it be a good idea to change the Water Pump? I kinda don't want to mess with it so what would be the average cost to get it changed at the dealer?
 

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You don't have to change the water pump until it goes out. Just check your coolant every now and then to make sure its topped off. When the water pump goes out it leaks from the bottom to tell you its going bad. You will notice your car A/C is not blowing cold air anymore and your temperature gauge will go up. When that happens either put more water/coolant in to get you back home or to the mechanic.
But for piece of mind, Autozone has a generic water pump for like 80 dollars and a lifetime guarantee. Isn't too hard to install and plenty of videos of how tos on youtube. Hardest part is talking off the belt. I think the OEM one goes for $150 plus Honda mechanic labor costs.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Is it bad that i had to refill the Coolant Reservoir?

I changed the Coolant on my R18 on 4/24/20, and i had to refill the Reservoir to the max line on 7/18/20. The level was almost hitting the low line.
 

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There may have been some air trapped in the system that worked itself out which could be why it was a little low. For now maybe chalk it up to that.

Also, the way I check the fluid levels on any car is to check when the engine is fully warm, like after driving at least a few miles. Keep in mind when the engine is completely cool, the outside temperature will affect the levels.

Of course it is worrisome to have to replenish fluids. I would think if the block were cracked, it would be losing fluid a lot faster than what you are. One common spot for cracks is slightly behind the exhaust heat shield, so get a flashlight and look to the left of it to see if there are cracks or evidence of coolant leaks.

Though some would think this is overkill, but I check all the fluids once a week. How often do you check all yours?

For the pump, I do not think that would matter either way but I would not mess with it unless you have to, supposedly there is one 8 mm allen head bolt that can be a nightmare to deal with.

Finally, if there IS a coolant leak that is not from the block, do not automatically assume it is the pump. I made that mistake on my other car. Replacing the pump on it requires removing the timing belt. I had everything mostly torn down and do you know what the leak was from? A hose clamp had come loose. Yep, instead of it being a two minute repair, it ended up taking about four hours.
 
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