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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to get the gist of how to tune part throttle. Vitviper was kind enough to perfect WOT tuning, set all of my cam angles/ignition values (perfectly I might add, car feels great with 0 knocks). Only thing left to do is tune the part throttle since it's all over the place. I want to try and just do this myself since I've already spent over $300 on a wasted tune and I can't really afford to be paying others for a tune right now. I took a few screenshots of what FPM is showing me. I took a datalog of cruising in 3rd gear. At the point in my pictures, I'm showing a 12.7 AFR (should be 14.7 for part throttle, right?). I follow through Hondata's vid, and this is what I get to. Confusion ensues lol.

Normal view:



Then changed to Lambda view:



Then to fuel change view:



After this part, I'm just confused. Hondata's vid basically says.. we can see we're running rich here, so add 10% fuel. I'm not sure how they come to the conclusion of what % of fuel to add or subtract, nor where I see that on the "fuel change view". In fact, I'm confused why "fuel change view" even comes into play since in the vid, it looks like Hondata just looks at the lambda table, sees it's rich and goes from there. Am I supposed to click on each box and adjust it to the % value that's on it?
 

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If you read the help file on PT tuning it will explain the process a lot more clearly. For PT you are going to be tuning columns 2-6 Column 7 is a medium-high load column.

Do it just like the help file says and you should get your strims down to 2%
 

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You're just reading into it a bit too much. It's hard to conclude any changes that need to be made via a daily driving datalog; you'll need to get some good logs via Hondata's part-throttle tuning instruction (lock a cam angle, and accelerate in 2nd gear a number of times with different throttle.) This will fill the chart with many more values, and you'll be able to see patterns in them when comparing to your current AFR.

Then, you make a handful of small changes at a time. It can be a one-night affair, but to get things really dialed in, expect to repeat the entire process a few times for each cam angle.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm gonna give the cam angle locking datalogs a shot. I guess this is why my paid tune never materialized to anything because this was all I did for the part throttle tuning
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Gotcha. To lock the cam angle, do I just replace all the cam angles on the low cam with 0, 15, etc, save that cal as a different calibration for that cam angle, and proceed? Or is there a way to just make it lock on one cam angle on the original cal?
 

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I do it all of the tuning in one cal. Start by making a copy of your current cal so you have the original composite cam map saved somewhere.

Then enable live tuning for your "fuel low" and "cam angle low", upload to the car and then proceed with tuning.

Set the cam angle low to all 0's, do your datalog runs as Hondata describes. Make adjustments to the fuel, then datalog again.

If you see that your trims haven't changed you may be experiencing the live table upload bug. If that happens try hitting "update all live tuning tables" under the online menu before doing each datalog. That'll insure that you're always running your updated live tuning values.

Repeat on the 0 cam table until you're happy with your trims in each load column. Remember you only need to do cols 2-6.

Then repeat for the other cam angle tables. Note that you won't see the cam move away from 0 until you're over ~1200 rpm, this is due to a failsafe in the ECU to protect from low oil pressure, similar to how you're not supposed to ever set the VTEC crossover lower than 2000 rpm.

When you've tuned your trims satisfactorily across all cam indices (50 may be sketchy since it's hard to get the engine to rev N/A at 50 cam at light throttle), open up your old calibration containing your composite cam tables in another FPM instance and copy them back to your tuned cal.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Perfect, thanks Jay. One last question. Once I see the suggested fuel changes in the column, how do I translate that to what I'm supposed to change it to? For example, if I need to remove 10% of fuel, will most of the cells in that column have a figure around 10%?
 

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Yes, you average it out until they all get close to 0. Usually the first run or two, I'll try to average out my changes across the entire column. After that I'll edit cell by cell to zero in on the ideal fuel.

ALSO I'm big on drawing my fuel in 2d view. I always try to keep the 2d graph looking silky smooth. I usually spend more time sculpting my fuel to look like a piece of art than I do actually looking at the percentages in the lambda overlay. It seems to work out pretty well. ;)
 

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Yes, you average it out until they all get close to 0. Usually the first run or two, I'll try to average out my changes across the entire column. After that I'll edit cell by cell to zero in on the ideal fuel.

ALSO I'm big on drawing my fuel in 2d view. I always try to keep the 2d graph looking silky smooth. I usually spend more time sculpting my fuel to look like a piece of art than I do actually looking at the percentages in the lambda overlay. It seems to work out pretty well. ;)
:rotfl: the smooth fuel maps. I remember the Hondata video saying the same thing...When I messed with some fueling I did the same thing, made the fuel curve as beautiful as possible.
 

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Yes, you average it out until they all get close to 0. Usually the first run or two, I'll try to average out my changes across the entire column. After that I'll edit cell by cell to zero in on the ideal fuel.

ALSO I'm big on drawing my fuel in 2d view. I always try to keep the 2d graph looking silky smooth. I usually spend more time sculpting my fuel to look like a piece of art than I do actually looking at the percentages in the lambda overlay. It seems to work out pretty well. ;)
I did this for my WOT and just started editing the areas on the 2d graph by dragging them to be smooth. worked well :D
 
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