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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was trying to switch out my rotors and pads today and the bottom bolt on the caliper seems to be overtorqued. I killed a socket trying to get it off, WD 40'd the shiz out of it and almost pulled my arm out of the socket trying to get it off but its not budging. I dont have an impact wrench so I can't go that route but at this point I need to finish the job because I have zero pad at this point. Anyone got any good tips on how I might to about this. I only have a hydraulic jack so i can't really get too much leverage the way things are. I cant afford to take it to a shop so Ive got to figure this out somehow. Any help would be much appreciated.
 

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Which bolt are you wrenching on? Reason I ask, if you're getting close to pulling out your arm, you should have snapped the M8 bolt on your sliders. If you're wrenching on the bolt that attaches your caliper bracket to the knuckle, you're on the wrong one.

Assuming you're on the M8 slider bolt, use a box end wrench and tap it with a hammer. These bolts tend to stick, you'll get a lot further with a sharp impact then putting all your weight behind it.

If that doesn't work, try 'gently' tapping the actual bolt head with a small hammer. If that fails, try heat... but be careful... if you see the slider boot smoking you're too hot.

Once you get it out, make sure you use anti-seize liberally before reinstalling.


-SWRT
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bought a breaker bar and it worked like a charm. Didn't help that the rotor was corroded on as well, so a crowbar had to be used to take care of the problem. I greased up everything nice and good before any screws or bolts went back on. Brakes are 100X better now.
 

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I hope you used high temperature anti-seize? And then only on the part of the caliper that your pads slide against.
Also, I hope you didn't grease the threads for your caliper bolts. You're supposed to use blue loc-tite on them. Do you want your brake bolts coming loose?
 

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Which bolt are you wrenching on? Reason I ask, if you're getting close to pulling out your arm, you should have snapped the M8 bolt on your sliders. If you're wrenching on the bolt that attaches your caliper bracket to the knuckle, you're on the wrong one.

-SWRT
How else do you suppose he is going to replace the brake disc? You have to remove the caliper bracket from the steering knuckle in order to do that.
 

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I hope you used high temperature anti-seize? And then only on the part of the caliper that your pads slide against.
Also, I hope you didn't grease the threads for your caliper bolts. You're supposed to use blue loc-tite on them. Do you want your brake bolts coming loose?
You don't put anti-seize on the pad retainers ("the part of the caliper that your pads slide against"). You use Molykote 77 or some other variant of brake pad grease. Anti-seize is placed on bolts that tend to corrode because they are placed against a dissimilar metal, they go through heat cycles (exhaust bolts), or they are exposed to harsh conditions (salt).

And like the other guy said, you don't need to apply Loc-tite to any of the brake component bolts. They don't come with Hondalock or Loc-tite from the factory, so there's no need for you to apply it. Torque to spec is the best precaution against any bolt coming unfastened (unless the service manual specifically states to apply Hondalock).
 
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