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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've always like the idea of the T1R--an enclosed icebox with some bling and making power across the powerband. The problem I realized though, was that the build quality was... meh. On the outside it looked snazzy, but in the inside (where it counts) the thing was so rough.

One day for kicks, I lightly sanded the inside of the intake box, and it surprisingly made a noticeable difference, making the drive/revs smoother. So I wondered: what if I were to make the inside completely smooth, and make this as least restrictive as I can? Thus started my 6-month-ish project.

Part 1: intake tube
The first thing I wanted to address was the intake tubing. I have an original X MAF lying around, and have always wanted to use it. So I bought a CRV intake tube, tried matching that with the X MAF and the T1R box... no luck. The design of the T1R (M&M) box doesn't allow for a lot of intake tube space. I tried cutting down the stock SI tube and fitting the X MAF, was still too long.



CRV tube, fitting the MAF in, still no luck.


While this was happening, the T1R box was off, and I was running with only the inlet air scoop. But with the OEM intake box, I realized my MPG dropped considerably. I surmised that the OEM FD2 Type R header installed had made my car run more rich, thus hurting the MPG. Since MAF-less intake tubing typically makes the car run more lean, I then decided to just use the T1R intake tubing that doesn't have vanes, and optimize the breathing of that. My intake tube plan:



Since I had a now-useless CRV tube that was chopped up, I figured I could use its breather tube, and replace the restrictive grommet that blocks a sizeable chunk of the air passage. The one thing I like about OEM intake tubes is that the breather tube doesn't protrude inside the tubing. Here's the T1R intake tube by default--notice how much the grommet sticks out inside:



So the grommet came off. Chopping off the CRV tubing enclosure, I JB weld it onto the T1R intake tube. It was cold-welded at an angle so that the breather tube could go in without bending the rubber too much:



One thing that bugged me about the T1R intake tube was the welds. Outside it's smooth, inside (where it matters) it's really intrusive and needlessly restrictive:




I dremeled the welds where I could, but some of the curves were impossible to reach without sanding manually by hand. What a pain in the rear, urgh. The welds were flattened so they stick out maybe 1mm at the most, a big change from the 3-6mm before. Since the tubing doesn't see that much stress, I'm not really worried about the weld being compromised because of all the sanding.



In the pic below, you can see the grommet protrusion is no more!



That finished the intaking tubing portion...

Part 2: Intake box

The intake box is what undoubtedly needed the most help. It was really rough, wavy and coarse throughout. Worse yet, it felt like the thing was coming apart. Pieces would chip off, the edges would crack, and I could poke holes by just lightly pushing on parts of it with my finger. So I not only wanted to make it smooth inside, but also more durable. To that end I turned to JB weld again, and bought lots of it (4-5 packs, lol).



Here's when I first starting filling it up with JB weld, and sanding it flat. Because the inside was so wavy, parts were sanded down to the fiberglass underneath.



This took freaking forever. JB weld is hard as heck, and sanding it by hand... eesh. I filled up all the holes and flattened out the insides, then painted it with semi-gloss paint. Masked the outside so the CF wouldn't get paint:



Here are the before and after shots. Here's the view of the whole box from the top before:



...and after. The paint didn't look as nice when I wet-sanded with 2000 grit sandpaper for some reason... but it was oh-so smooth (I'm not a painter, ah well). Was so smooth that you can actually see my reflection in the intake box in the pic, lol:



Some detail before/after shots. Here you can see how ugly the bottom of the base was, near the outlet. What the heck were they doing here?



Not very nice. Note the chip in the lower right corner:



After. No more weird crap, it's now smooth and straight. Chip also fixed:



Here's the front of the box, looking diagonally. Note how much the side sticks out. You can see a little fiberglass piece falling off or something. And to the top, it's really cracked and distressed:



...and after, none of that junk!



Looking to the front of the box. You can see how cracked the base is, as parts were so thin (maybe 0.5mm or less thick) that you can break pieces off with your finger.



Used JB weld to thicken the base and make it straight.



Diagonal shot to the back:



And after:




Verdict:
Man, it runs so much better than before. The T1R before didn't really have idling issues, but there was a very slight idling inconsistency (so light most won't notice). That's gone. It drives as smooth as stock. Warming up you feel some hiccups, but once it's warmed up it's as good as OEM in terms of drivability. And there's a lot more power in the low and especially mid-range now. Top-end sees some gain, but you notice it a lot in the lower revs. Oh and my fuel economy has been going back up again, woot.

Finally, here it is installed. I painted the blue couplings black with vinyl paint (which flexes), but it doesn't adhere well to the silicon at all. It might eventually come off, oh well. The top of the MAF mount was also painted black (it was bare aluminum before). I had to file/sand the latch portion of the intake box a bit, cus' they're prone to slipping off... kinda annoying. But I'm very satisfied with this intake now.



Hope you enjoyed the progression =) For future projects I may smoothen the intake air scoop and also get rid of the rubbing for the OEM lower portion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Eyeballing the HPS tube, I think even cutting it down it wouldn't fit--plus the angle of the intake box might not match with the HPS tube... and then I'd be wasting a $100 intake tube. I was about to buy 2 45 deg elbows and make my own... but as mentioned in the thread, I actually wanted the tubing to be vane-less so that it'd run more lean. I may eventually make my own intake tube, but this seems to be doing the job just fine. Plus the bends in the T1R tube are less than 45 (maybe 30? dunno), so it could be less restrictive airflow-wise.
 

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instead of teh JB weld, you should of mixed fiberglass resin and auto body filler. makes liek a pancake batter consistancy mix, that is thin enough to brush on and hold itself in place. easy to build up thickness and smooth it out.
 

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:clapping:
Simply amazing job sir. I am very impressed. Awesome job on done everything. Please let us know what the long term results of this are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the positive feedback guys =) Yeah, the T1R box quality was pretty mediocre, and considering I paid decent cash for it I figured it needed fixing bad.

Nice work! You did a great job fixing the inside of the box. How did you apply the JB weld so smoothly?
instead of teh JB weld, you should of mixed fiberglass resin and auto body filler. makes liek a pancake batter consistancy mix, that is thin enough to brush on and hold itself in place. easy to build up thickness and smooth it out.
I thought of using autobody filler and/or resin, but part of the goal was to also make the thing really stiff and sturdy. Since JB weld is notoriously strong, thought that'd be a better solution. Plus Bondo is toxic, and smelly, and with JB weld I could just apply it in my room without stinking the whole place up =P If it were simply a matter of smoothening it out, I woulda used epoxy or something softer/easier.... but the thing felt like it was falling apart. I could push down on my finger nails in some places and it'd crack.

As for applying JB weld smoothly, lots of work, lots of reapplication. I'd cover it with JB weld, sand down, cover it some more, sand down... probably repeated that process like 5-6 times, took forever.

nice, is your car tuned on flashpro or accessport?
No flashpro, though I want to tune this badly. It already runs really well without, but I know it's not operating to its full potential.
 

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Awesome job Aki. I can't wait to see what you come up with once you become bored of this intake in it's current state. :laughing:
 

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Nice work on the intake box. I think for the price T1R sells this intake at, it should come like this outta the factory.
That my freind is very true... To pay 500 plus on a intake simply for a carbon box tube and lower snorkel is crazy. I always wanted this intake because its stock appearance and nice carbon looks. I simply cannot believe they would release something in this type of disrepair!! You did an amazing job on it though looks great and now in the condition you have it I would pay that much money for it. Get yourself flashpro,cobb and smooth out any driveabilty issues and see this intake really shine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Yeah now I really want a Flashpro, lol.

Cool thing is, as my ECU is adjusting to the intake, I actually feel like it's getting more power =O Usually as the ECU adjusts the power gets worse, but I even feel a noticeable difference at the top-end now. It's performing beyond my expectations. The only criticism I have is the occasional bog when warming up. But the revs climb soo freely now, it's really responsive.

As for the price, I wouldn't mind spending that kinda money (well, I alrd did lol) if the build quality was good. But I feel it's too chintsy to be worth the price. The design and the idea itself is great, the execution leaves a lot to be desired.
 

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I'm glad you made the intake look more like it should be from the factory.

I also can't believe how poor T1R put works into the intake and still sell it for premium price.

The Mugen intake may be a little bit more expensive, but the finish product and quality is a lot better and similar to your final result. :thumb:





 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yeah in retrospect I would've just bought the Mugen intake and made a DIY tubing, which would've been maybe a couple hundred dollars more, but also have the name-brand bling factor to it =/

Looking at that Mugen bottom of the intake box, wondering if I should defin and smooth out the OEM box, hmm. Problem is I can't take it off without being completely intake-less.

 
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