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Discussion Starter #1
Hello 8thcivic friends, I am embarking on a coilover quest and wanted to document the journey. I've had my Civic for over a decade now and broke the 200k mile barrier not too long ago. The ol' Civic is getting on in years now and it's getting harder to justify big dollar upgrades nowadays, so I did what everyone says not to do. I did the unthinkable. I purchased a set of dirt-cheap eBay coilovers.

This is going to be the second set of coilovers I've put on this car, the first set being Godspeed Mono-RS coilovers. Those coilovers were great for a while, but 5 years of salty midwest winters just destroyed them. The lock rings are completely seized up and I'm getting a pretty bad creaking noise in the back now. I was originally planning to just re-buy those Godspeed coilovers, but I was surprised by how many more low-dollar options were on the market compared to when I was last looking 5 years ago. The Godspeed coilovers I purchased at the time were sort-of considered the "acceptable low-end" coilover option at around $700, and Racelands were the cheapest option in town and were generally mocked for being terrible. But now ebay is full of these mystery Chinese brands that are undercutting even Racelands by over $100. So I thought, "why the hell not" and bought from the bottom of the car parts barrel. Even if these only last half as long as my last coilover set, well, they were less than half the price.

So I'll be documenting my experience with these coilovers here over the next few years, and I'll try to give an honest comparative review to a product that most people hand-wave away as being to bad to even consider. If they suck, I'll let you know!

On to the goods. Here are the specs from the eBay listing:

Brand: maXpeedingrods
Manufacturer Part Number: SDNIAH
Adjustable level: 24 levels of adjustable damper
Interchange Part Number: for Honda Civic 2006-2011
Other Part Number: LX EX SI FA5 FG2 FG1
Front spring rate: 7 kg/mm (392 in/lbs)
Rear spring rate: 10 kg/mm (560 in/lbs)
Warranty: 2 Year
Fit for: For Honda CIVIC FA5 FG2 FG1
UPC: 6941441726880

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Stay tuned for install in the next few days.
 

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Aw man bro, should've gotten some Raceland Ultimo Coilovers during black friday, I bought mine for $379 and they're lifetime warranty. But those look ebay ones don't half bad either, for the money I say not bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
First Update:

Thank goodness I'm working from home right now because it took about a week to get the rear shocks installed after I started. The bolts that go through the shocks were completely seized up so I had to bust out the sawsall to cut them out and then I waited a week for Mr.Honda to send me some replacement bolts. Install of the new coilovers went just fine with no fitment issues. The only notable difference between these eBay coilovers and my older set was the rear spring has a lighter spring rate compared to the Godspeeds, which you can see in the side by side shot.

One major drawback of these shocks I've noticed so far, the lock-ring adjustment wrenches that came with these really suck. They are so thin that it makes them hard to handle and hook into the lock rings very securely. A minor issue, but I thought it was worth mentioning.

I hope to get started on the front coilovers soon.
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Looking forward to the rest of this, I am going to be doing mine soon so I forsee this being very useful.
 

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also out of curiosity, did you try penetrating oil on those bolts? I am assuming you did, but if it comes down to it I might just pre order them and have the bolts on hand just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
also out of curiosity, did you try penetrating oil on those bolts? I am assuming you did, but if it comes down to it I might just pre order them and have the bolts on hand just in case.
I did give them a shot of PB Blaster a few days before, but no luck. The problem with seized bolts on shock absorbers is that the shocks have a steel collar inside of the rubber bushings that the bolts go through, so when everything gets all rusty and frozen together that collar will become one with the bolt. I was able to get the bolts to rotate, but it was just spinning that steel collar inside of the shock bushings with it so I just couldn't get the shocks to let go of the bolt. This happened the last time when I replaced the stock shocks with the Godspeed coilovers, but at the time I didn't know about the miracle product that is Anti-Seize compound. Nowadays, every bolt I manage to take off of the car without stripping or snapping gets a coating of anti-seize.
 

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I did give them a shot of PB Blaster a few days before, but no luck. The problem with seized bolts on shock absorbers is that the shocks have a steel collar inside of the rubber bushings that the bolts go through, so when everything gets all rusty and frozen together that collar will become one with the bolt. I was able to get the bolts to rotate, but it was just spinning that steel collar inside of the shock bushings with it so I just couldn't get the shocks to let go of the bolt. This happened the last time when I replaced the stock shocks with the Godspeed coilovers, but at the time I didn't know about the miracle product that is Anti-Seize compound. Nowadays, every bolt I manage to take off of the car without stripping or snapping gets a coating of anti-seize.
well I just learned something today, had zero idea there was a steel collar on the inside, thank you for sharing the knowledge
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I took a few weeks off before giving the front coilovers a go after how much of a pain it was to remove the old rear coilovers, but the fronts were actually a piece of cake. The whole swap of the front coilovers took maybe 1.5 hours, not bad!

Taking a look at the new and old coilovers side-by-side, they are largely identical with a few small differences. They installed just fine and the fitment with the stock hardware was perfect. Two things I noticed that I would consider a knock against these coilovers were: 1. The thickness of the metal that made up the bracket that mounts to the wheel hub was noticeably thinner than the old coilovers. Hopefully this isn't an issue, but it could see it allowing undue flex in the suspension. 2. The old coilovers' camber adjustment allen screws on the top plate were recessed, where the new ones are just screwed on top. This originally caused an interference fit when I went to install, but fortunately there was an additional set of holes on the top plate that allowed me to relocate the screws and get them installed. See the last two photos for a visual of what I'm talking about
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