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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I've had my SI coupe for over a year and after a lot of fantasizing, I recently decided to start modding it. The first and only mod I have done is a set of Koni STR.T Orange shocks and struts. I've noticed a decent increase in handling and I feel more confident around some of the nastier corners in my area. Now I'm trying to figure out where to go next with trying to improve the handling. I have been doing a decent amount of research and have my eyes on the eibach sway bars (front and back) but since I'm still new at this I'm a little confused and have a few concerns. I still have stock springs so I'm still sitting at stock height. Would putting the sway bars on make my car too stiff and increase my chances of flipping or am I just being paranoid from a lack of understanding? If it would and I absolutely had to lower it, would a one inch drop be a big deal if you live in a area with a lot of potholes?
 

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My understanding was that swaybars shouldn't make a car stiffer. In probably too simple of terms the swaybar is only controlling how weight is transferred and not actually changing the "stiffness" of the ride in anyway. Someone correct me if I am wrong.
 

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A one inch drop is nothing, you should be fine. The only concern would be rubbing, if you had oversize wheels and tires. The sway bars do add stiffness, but (basically) only when cornering, so while driving in a straight line it will feel the same.
 

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A rear sway bar will be great with the factory suspension. You'll get faster turn-in and the car will respond better in turns.

Sway bars do stiffen up the rear . . . for example, I run my Integra without a rear sway bar since I have 1000lb springs in the rear, but with the sway bar I run 800lb springs. You lose a little suspension movement and obviously gain weight with the sway bar, but for the street, it is a much better option.

No worries about flipping or your car becoming dangerous . . you would need a huge sway bar that would rip out the stock mounts to get anywhere near that area. Just get an adjustable rear and experiment with the settings . . .
 

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I would upgrade the rubber bushing for the energy suspension poly bushings. Ever since I did the full kit conversion the car has been awesome on handling. I'm running Koni Yellows, Swift springs, Stock SI sways (will be upgrading the rear sway bar next), Energy Suspension Kit and get great handling on A/S tires for daily driving.
 

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If you're looking to increase handling a sway bar would be good next step, they're designed to decrease body roll which will make a noticeable difference in handling in the corners.

The Eibach Sway Bar is a great choice. They come with instructions and all the hardware you need for a painless installation, along with a million mile warranty!

We have them in stock and ready to ship!

Eibach Anti-Roll Kit: Eibach Anti Roll Kit - Excelerate's Honda & Acura Store - Japanese Performance Specialist
 

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My recommendation is to add a rear Progress 22mm swaybar and leave the front one stock. The Eibach rear bar is too small (only 19mm) and the stock Si front bar is plenty big for the street. With the Progress 22mm rear bar, you'll probably want to get new rear endlinks too... the stock ones can be re-used, but they can be a real pain to remove and reuse; so check those before buying to see if you think they will come off ok (strong recommendation is to clean the threads on the endlink studs because if you don't, you'll break the hex end of the stud trying to hold it while turning the nut).

Good luck! :)
Chris
 

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We have the Progress Bar RedShiftChris reccomended in stock as well, and if you're looking to improve handling as much as you can, a wider track on an axle reduces load (body roll) transfer from that axle. So you may find some benefit in adding some wheel spacers!

However, over stiffening the front with firm springs, or anti-roll bars can cause understeer. So personally, I would leave the front how it is.

Progress Bar: Progress Anti-Sway Bar - Excelerate's Honda & Acura Store - Japanese Performance Specialist
Spacers: H&R TRAK Spacers & Adapters - Excelerate's Honda & Acura Store - Japanese Performance Specialist

Happy modding!
 

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We have the Progress Bar RedShiftChris reccomended in stock as well, and if you're looking to improve handling as much as you can, a wider track on an axle reduces load (body roll) transfer from that axle. So you may find some benefit in adding some wheel spacers!

However, over stiffening the front with firm springs, or anti-roll bars can cause understeer. So personally, I would leave the front how it is.

Progress Bar: Progress Anti-Sway Bar - Excelerate's Honda & Acura Store - Japanese Performance Specialist
Spacers: H&R TRAK Spacers & Adapters - Excelerate's Honda & Acura Store - Japanese Performance Specialist

Happy modding!
fyi running a wider track is equivalent to running a smaller swaybar on that end of the car. So, widening the rear track will make the car understeer. :) Still, you can usually offset this with a change is alignment, tire pressure, or something else. For example, if you run a wider rear track, you may find running a little less toe in is helpful to get the car to rotate.

Then again I ran max toe out to the my car to rotate with the stock rear bushings...they have a ton of compliance and work against you at the limit. If you change the rear bushings to something stiffer like the Energy Suspension poly bushings, then you'll end up running less toe out (or more toe in). I run 515/1100 springs on my national level STF autocross car, with a stock front swaybar, the 24mm rear bar, front and rear ES lower arm bushings, and alignment: a little front toe out, 0 rear toe, -3.0 front and rear camber.

I was 0.2 seconds off winning the national championship with this setup. So, feel confident these 8th gen cars can be made to handle well if you know what you are doing. Mine is an 2007 Civic DX 2DR running in STF where I think it is competitive. It is about 2430 lbs with kirkey seats.

The Si generally is not very competitive in STX (where it is because of the torsen front diff).... even though it handles great too. But it's up against some fast competition with the WRX, BRZ/FRS twins, and BMWs.

Hope that helps. :)
Chris
 
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