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I personally have no idea how long I should keep my car running before I start to drive so my question is how long should I keep it running before I drive?

Only reason I'm asking is because my dad thinks he's mr. Car expert and is telling me that letting it run is pointless unless it's winter and I think that's wrong, so I told him I'd ask you guys lol because he's like every car is different so I don't think he'd want me to google it ha thanks
 

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I let my Si run for 5-7 min in the morning before driving. Si's tend to idle high on cold starts(around 2.5rpm) so it's a good idea to let the rpms drop to about 1.5. before taking off. Im not sure about r18.
 

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^2x
i do the same.. 5-7mins in the morning and when the car sit for a long time like when im at work or in a store for more then a hour before driving...idle high on cold starts around 2k rpm then slowly work it way down around 800-900rpm ..that when i start driving...
 

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depends...usually let it get 2 bars on the temp gauge, but sometimes I'll be doing something and it will fully warm up before I start driving.

I hate driving cold, and having to ride the brake, cause the cold engine wants to go 15mph in 1st gear.
 

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I personally have no idea how long I should keep my car running before I start to drive so my question is how long should I keep it running before I drive?

Only reason I'm asking is because my dad thinks he's mr. Car expert and is telling me that letting it run is pointless unless it's winter and I think that's wrong, so I told him I'd ask you guys lol because he's like every car is different so I don't think he'd want me to google it ha thanks
I personally let mine warm up for about 4 minutes
 

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The best way to warm it up is to drive it until the engine temperature begins to rise, avoid high speeds and rapid acceleration. Things like wheel bearings, steering, suspension, transmission and tires only warm up when your car is moving.

Driving your car actually cuts warm-up time in half. This reduces fuel consumption (which saves money) and greenhouse gas emissions.


Edit : Listen to your dad. lol
 
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I dont really give it time to warm up. I just drive conservatively and by the time I make it out of my neighborhood and get it on the main roads, the car has about 4-5 bars. Enough for some :vtec:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
i forgot to mension hes like its bad for my car to idle for like 5 mins cuz he was bitching at me when i left my car on and ran inside my house quickly
 

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I start the engine, give it about 30 seconds or so, then when i drive i accelerate like grandma until i get out onto a highway... then i shift at 2000 RPM until it warms.
 

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I do like most other and wait until it drops to 1500 and then drive easy until it gets up to temp. I am in florida and the car is kept in the garage so it usually doesnt take long to get it up to temp.
 

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I let my Si run for 5-7 min in the morning before driving. Si's tend to idle high on cold starts(around 2.5rpm) so it's a good idea to let the rpms drop to about 1.5. before taking off. Im not sure about r18.

:facepalm: Something must be wrong with your Si if it idles @ 2,500rpm on a cold start. :pat:

OP, there is absolutely NO need to idle for more then a minute, even during the winter (unless you're trying to defrost the windshield and you can't see = no go)

Idling excessively to warm up the engine is not practical and not the best way to go about it... Like mentioned above, when you're idling, only the engine is warming up. The tranny is still cold = notchy shifts, brakes, tires, etc.

Idling excessively might also be harmful. During a cold start, the engine runs extremely rich (to help warm up the catalytic converter, as well as engine warm up) although you might think its a good idea, all that extra fuel gets past the piston rings and dilutes your oil (meaning the oil gets contaminated with fuel and thins down which = less and less protection over the course of an oil change)

^You dont want to do this.

Idling for roughly 20-30 seconds is MORE then enough time. Enough heat has built up inside the combustion chamber to where the piston rings expand to their normal size and start working as designed.

If you start giving large amounts of load on the engine as soon as you start it, this is where the most engine wear happens as far as cylinder wall damage is concerned.

It takes the Si aprox 10-15 mins of DRIVING in warm weather to really warm up all of the engine internals to operating temp (engine is HOT and not baby milk bottle warm)

^The tranny is still pretty cold at this point from my personal experience with my Si over the course of 3 years and 65,000 miles.

My start procedure:

Ignition to ON to prime the fuel pump (2 seconds, results in easier cranking, esp during cold weather) Then i push my "engine start" button :laughing:
I then instantly put it in reverse and ease the clutch a little to roll outta the garage (no gas applied, the high idle has more then enough power)
by the time i roll down the driveway, crawl my way over the standard driveway drain gutter and unto the street, put on my seat belt, turn up the tunes, the revs are starting to drop to 1,500. I give it a few seconds and take off gently, shifting @ 2,500 from 1st-2nd and then 2.8k going into 3rd.

Then i purr my way down the block running past a few stop signs to avoid stopping (keeping the revs @ about 2.5ish until a few bars appear on the gauge, then i proceed to shift @ 3k until the coolant is at OP, then 3.5-4k shift points are used for another 3-5 mins to allow the rest of the engine (and OIL) to catch up to temp. by then i shift @ my regular 4.5k. A few more mins of cruising and i'll engage Vtec if needed (4.7K) slowly rising the revs as time goes by.

The its nothing but :vtec: and 8.6k shift points.

I have 65k on my Si which sees the track (time attack) at least twice a year and gets driven VERY HARD on a daily basis and my engine is in tip top shape, with UOA (used oil analysis) to back it up.

^sorry for the long post but i like to educate people. I used to work in a shop and saw what engines look like inside from not being taken care of properly or from improper abuse. Years of research online as well as talking with hundreds of mechanics, race car mechanics, etc etc, I've come up with this ANAL start up procedure.

:wigglesmiley:
 

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:facepalm: Something must be wrong with your Si if it idles @ 2,500rpm on a cold start. :pat:

OP, there is absolutely NO need to idle for more then a minute, even during the winter (unless you're trying to defrost the windshield and you can't see = no go)

Idling excessively to warm up the engine is not practical and not the best way to go about it... Like mentioned above, when you're idling, only the engine is warming up. The tranny is still cold = notchy shifts, brakes, tires, etc.

Idling excessively might also be harmful. During a cold start, the engine runs extremely rich (to help warm up the catalytic converter, as well as engine warm up) although you might think its a good idea, all that extra fuel gets past the piston rings and dilutes your oil (meaning the oil gets contaminated with fuel and thins down which = less and less protection over the course of an oil change)

^You dont want to do this.

Idling for roughly 20-30 seconds is MORE then enough time. Enough heat has built up inside the combustion chamber to where the piston rings expand to their normal size and start working as designed.

If you start giving large amounts of load on the engine as soon as you start it, this is where the most engine wear happens as far as cylinder wall damage is concerned.

It takes the Si aprox 10-15 mins of DRIVING in warm weather to really warm up all of the engine internals to operating temp (engine is HOT and not baby milk bottle warm)

^The tranny is still pretty cold at this point from my personal experience with my Si over the course of 3 years and 65,000 miles.

My start procedure:

Ignition to ON to prime the fuel pump (2 seconds, results in easier cranking, esp during cold weather) Then i push my "engine start" button :laughing:
I then instantly put it in reverse and ease the clutch a little to roll outta the garage (no gas applied, the high idle has more then enough power)
by the time i roll down the driveway, crawl my way over the standard driveway drain gutter and unto the street, put on my seat belt, turn up the tunes, the revs are starting to drop to 1,500. I give it a few seconds and take off gently, shifting @ 2,500 from 1st-2nd and then 2.8k going into 3rd.

Then i purr my way down the block running past a few stop signs to avoid stopping (keeping the revs @ about 2.5ish until a few bars appear on the gauge, then i proceed to shift @ 3k until the coolant is at OP, then 3.5-4k shift points are used for another 3-5 mins to allow the rest of the engine (and OIL) to catch up to temp. by then i shift @ my regular 4.5k. A few more mins of cruising and i'll engage Vtec if needed (4.7K) slowly rising the revs as time goes by.

The its nothing but :vtec: and 8.6k shift points.

I have 65k on my Si which sees the track (time attack) at least twice a year and gets driven VERY HARD on a daily basis and my engine is in tip top shape, with UOA (used oil analysis) to back it up.

^sorry for the long post but i like to educate people. I used to work in a shop and saw what engines look like inside from not being taken care of properly or from improper abuse. Years of research online as well as talking with hundreds of mechanics, race car mechanics, etc etc, I've come up with this ANAL start up procedure.

:wigglesmiley:
Could not have said it any better myself.
 

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:facepalm: Something must be wrong with your Si if it idles @ 2,500rpm on a cold start. :pat:

OP, there is absolutely NO need to idle for more then a minute, even during the winter (unless you're trying to defrost the windshield and you can't see = no go)

Idling excessively to warm up the engine is not practical and not the best way to go about it... Like mentioned above, when you're idling, only the engine is warming up. The tranny is still cold = notchy shifts, brakes, tires, etc.

Idling excessively might also be harmful. During a cold start, the engine runs extremely rich (to help warm up the catalytic converter, as well as engine warm up) although you might think its a good idea, all that extra fuel gets past the piston rings and dilutes your oil (meaning the oil gets contaminated with fuel and thins down which = less and less protection over the course of an oil change)

^You dont want to do this.

Idling for roughly 20-30 seconds is MORE then enough time. Enough heat has built up inside the combustion chamber to where the piston rings expand to their normal size and start working as designed.

If you start giving large amounts of load on the engine as soon as you start it, this is where the most engine wear happens as far as cylinder wall damage is concerned.

It takes the Si aprox 10-15 mins of DRIVING in warm weather to really warm up all of the engine internals to operating temp (engine is HOT and not baby milk bottle warm)

^The tranny is still pretty cold at this point from my personal experience with my Si over the course of 3 years and 65,000 miles.

My start procedure:

Ignition to ON to prime the fuel pump (2 seconds, results in easier cranking, esp during cold weather) Then i push my "engine start" button :laughing:
I then instantly put it in reverse and ease the clutch a little to roll outta the garage (no gas applied, the high idle has more then enough power)
by the time i roll down the driveway, crawl my way over the standard driveway drain gutter and unto the street, put on my seat belt, turn up the tunes, the revs are starting to drop to 1,500. I give it a few seconds and take off gently, shifting @ 2,500 from 1st-2nd and then 2.8k going into 3rd.

Then i purr my way down the block running past a few stop signs to avoid stopping (keeping the revs @ about 2.5ish until a few bars appear on the gauge, then i proceed to shift @ 3k until the coolant is at OP, then 3.5-4k shift points are used for another 3-5 mins to allow the rest of the engine (and OIL) to catch up to temp. by then i shift @ my regular 4.5k. A few more mins of cruising and i'll engage Vtec if needed (4.7K) slowly rising the revs as time goes by.

The its nothing but :vtec: and 8.6k shift points.

I have 65k on my Si which sees the track (time attack) at least twice a year and gets driven VERY HARD on a daily basis and my engine is in tip top shape, with UOA (used oil analysis) to back it up.

^sorry for the long post but i like to educate people. I used to work in a shop and saw what engines look like inside from not being taken care of properly or from improper abuse. Years of research online as well as talking with hundreds of mechanics, race car mechanics, etc etc, I've come up with this ANAL start up procedure.

:wigglesmiley:
k watched mine idle this morning, it was at 2krpm not 2.5k lol..My mistake
 

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Cold starts, start to idle at 1900 for me. I let it get down to 1500, which is 30-45 seconds? Start driving, while keeping the revs below 3k at all times. Once it's half warmed up, I start driving a little faster.

If it's super super early in the morning, I drive off right away because I have a loud exhaust.
 

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^yea it usually takes mine 30 -/+ seconds for the revs to drop to 1,500rpm. There is a noticeable change in exhaust and engine tone at that point. The engine sounds a little more happier and less noisy because the oil started flowing, lubricating everything, esp up top in the valvetrain which is the loudest part of the engine.
 
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