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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
do you just shoot the screws onto it or is there a special bracket or whatever you have to buy to install it?

i want my trunk free to store stuff so no amp or sub is going in there.
 

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um..not recommended. I'd get a peice of wood (at least 1/4" thick) against the seat first otherwise the screws could pull out the fabric.
 

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the seat has a frame to it. You can actually screw the wood into the frame of the seat. That will give you a solid base to work off of. You can get the material to wrap the wood in so that it matches the trunk pretty well.
 

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velcro with that xD j/k

as webby said use the frame to put the wood and cover it with the same fabric as the trunk to match it
 

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yeah i would screw the amps into wood, then velcro it or screw it in somehow. I would not velcro the amp onto the seats themsevles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
what do you guys think of this idea...i cut 1/2" mdf to the shape of the shaded area and mount the amp onto it?

 

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as long as the amp is mounted onto wood you'll be fine.. you can even wrap the wood in carpet too to make a finish look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i'm just stuck right now. i already wire everything up and ready and now just waiting to find a spot for the amp to power the speakers.






and where to put the amp!!
 

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I forgot, are you using your factory radio? I'm wondering why you cut your RCA wires instead of just plugging them in (if you have aftermarket).

Now if you ever change your mind, you'll have to re-run all new RCA's if your going from stock to aftermarket. Plus you should use a converter instead of doing what you did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
unplugged said:
I forgot, are you using your factory radio? I'm wondering why you cut your RCA wires instead of just plugging them in (if you have aftermarket).

Now if you ever change your mind, you'll have to re-run all new RCA's if your going from stock to aftermarket. Plus you should use a converter instead of doing what you did.
errr... the picture clearly shows that it's an aftermarket cd player. Pioneer Premier.

I didn't cut any rca, you're mistaken. the red wires are the audio & remote wires that the amp is going to power instead of using the head unit to power them.

the braided wires are the 3 rca cables (front, rear, & sub), yes my pioneer premier have 3 rca outputs :)
not only that it have 3, it's 3 hi-volts rca. trust me, i know what i'm doing. i just don't know wher to mount the amp without taking up trunk space/messing up factory seats.
 

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yeah i just glanced too quick..my bad.. i see what your doing now..

why aren't you running new wires from the amp to the speakers. I see your attaching 2 channels to the stock wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
it's going to be fine. trust me. i've done it to so many times. also, don't believe all of the hype from people saying you need 4 gauge this and 0 gauge that for the system.

the amp is only pushing 50 rms to each channel @ 14.4 volts so the stock wiring is going to be fine.

it's a marketing gimmicks that they're trying to sell you to get the priciest stuff possible. you need thicker wires this and more power for the amp that.

the pioneer head unit put out 22rms x 4 = 88rms total and the it still uses the stock power from the harness. have you seen how small the power cable is on the stock harness?? that thing is like 26 gauge lol.

So if the head unit is pulling 88rms through a thread size power wire on the stock wiring...the speaker wires can sure as hell take 50rms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
i see a lot of people using 4 gauge power cable to connect to their amps..but the truth is that, it is overkill. unless the amp is pushing out at least 600rms (NOT WATTs)
an 8 gauge would be just fine.


this infinity basslink uses 250rms and infinity themselves only recommend 10 gauge :) power cable. Take into the account that, manufacturers always like to play it on the extreme safe side to protect themselves & their products image, i would say a 10 gauge would surely be able to power 350-400rms with no problem.


Since the head unit runs 88rms through a single 16/18 gauge wire from the factory. I concluded that you do not have to ever run wires through any door unless the speakers uses over 100 rms. I don't know many 6 1/2 speakers that uses 100rms unless you're doing component system.
 

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Kroze said:
it's going to be fine. trust me. i've done it to so many times. also, don't believe all of the hype from people saying you need 4 gauge this and 0 gauge that for the system.

the amp is only pushing 50 rms to each channel @ 14.4 volts so the stock wiring is going to be fine.

it's a marketing gimmicks that they're trying to sell you to get the priciest stuff possible. you need thicker wires this and more power for the amp that.

the pioneer head unit put out 22rms x 4 = 88rms total and the it still uses the stock power from the harness. have you seen how small the power cable is on the stock harness?? that thing is like 26 gauge lol.

So if the head unit is pulling 88rms through a thread size power wire on the stock wiring...the speaker wires can sure as hell take 50rms.
I used to have a chart on what size power wire you need for the amount of power you will consume and the length of the wire. I always went by this rule. I also buy better speaker wire not because of the size so much, but because they are shielded better. Same with power wire and RCA's. A lot of people buy basic wire or use factory, and they are fine with it. But if you listen closely, you can sometimes hear interferance in the music your listening to at higher volumes.

RCA's are definitely the one thing I feel is neccessary to get well shielded cables. I've noticed the difference between a 10 dollar pair and a 50 dollar pair. I even tried relocating the wire to one side or the other, in the center, etc and the better RCA still sent a clearer signal to the amp to output a nice signal.

Yes, a lot of it is a gimmick to make more money. I've never used anything bigger then a 0 gauge wire, like 00, but I was running 5 amps, neons, and over 2000 watts in the system. My 2 gauge wire barely gave me enough juice at high volumes.

My rule of thumb for audio, is to buy the next size bigger - but only if you plan to upgrade your audio system later on.
 

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Kroze said:
i see a lot of people using 4 gauge power cable to connect to their amps..but the truth is that, it is overkill. unless the amp is pushing out at least 600rms (NOT WATTs)
an 8 gauge would be just fine.


this infinity basslink uses 250rms and infinity themselves only recommend 10 gauge :) power cable. Take into the account that, manufacturers always like to play it on the extreme safe side to protect themselves & their products image, i would say a 10 gauge would surely be able to power 350-400rms with no problem.


Since the head unit runs 88rms through a single 16/18 gauge wire from the factory. I concluded that you do not have to ever run wires through any door unless the speakers uses over 100 rms. I don't know many 6 1/2 speakers that uses 100rms unless you're doing component system.
i'm sure a 10gauge wire can power it fine.. but lets say you want to amp your new speakers and get better subs.. you just spent 20-30 bucks on that wire. for another 10 bucks, you could've bought an 8 or 4ga wire. It really depends on your plans and if you have them for the future.

I would've went with an 8 gauge wire on the basslink anyhow since there is some drop in power going to the trunk.
 

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I know that this issue has already been discussed but I was confused. I have an EX Sedan with the 60/40 folding seats. The back of the seats are all metal. It is not even a frame, it is a large metal sheet. Why couldn't I just screw the amp into the metal sheet of the seatback? What would putting a sheet of wood do for it? I would imagine a sheet of metal would be fine.

Maybe the back of the seats for the coup or non-folding seats are different?

unplugged said:
um..not recommended. I'd get a peice of wood (at least 1/4" thick) against the seat first otherwise the screws could pull out the fabric.
 

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Higher GA wire is used also becuase of the length of the run which is usually about 17 feet. Why make the amp work harder if you don't have to?
 

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jd1234 said:
I know that this issue has already been discussed but I was confused. I have an EX Sedan with the 60/40 folding seats. The back of the seats are all metal. It is not even a frame, it is a large metal sheet. Why couldn't I just screw the amp into the metal sheet of the seatback? What would putting a sheet of wood do for it? I would imagine a sheet of metal would be fine.

Maybe the back of the seats for the coup or non-folding seats are different?
you shouldn't screw an amp directly to the seat because you'll create what's known as a "ground loop" - i.e. your amp is grounded both from the -ve terminal to the vehicle chassis, and the amp chassis itself to the vehicle chassis. this has the potential to give you lots of noise problems later on.

what i did is i got a piece of 1/2" MDF, cut it to size, drill some countersunk holes for attaching the MDF to the seat, and then some more holes to attach the amp to the MDF. this way the only ground connection is through the -ve terminal.

here's a pic of my old amp:
 
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