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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As my username suggests, I am restoring my mom's old Civic to drive when i'm 15, but the car has been sitting for about 4 years, (parked summer 2017) and it has a few noticeable issues.
  1. My dad snapped a head bolt off trying to clean in the engine bay before starting the car ( Back Left )
  2. The clutch fluid is quite low, below the lines, but the clutch pedal feels normal. What are my chances of a leak?
  3. The passenger sun visor is ripped off, and I want to replace it if I can afford to.
  4. The tires are flat, and have been that way for quite a while.
  5. I don't want to incinerate the clutch trying to learn, anything I should wait to replace after learning to drive stick?
  6. The brake disks are quite rusty, do I need to replace them?
This is the best list i could come up with at the moment, feel free to ask for photos, but keep in mind I am in the PST time zone and it's well past midnight as i write this.
 

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1. That's a big issue right there, do you really mean head bolt or valve cover bolt? He would have had to have the valve cover off to access the head bolt.
2. Check the cmc or slave, is this an si or an lx manual? I know the si have a very bad cmc and slave but haven't really heard of a leak from them, try checking your lines (Clean them off and refill the clutch fluid, might want to bleed it to make sure clean fluid is in the system)
3. Again, depends on sedan or coupe but here: Amazon.com: Dasbecan Clear Gray Right Passenger Side Sun Visor Compatible with Honda Civic 2006-2011 Replaces# 83230-SNA-A01ZC : Automotive
4. Check tires for dry rot or any signs that they are bad. If they don't have those signs, try filling with air and see if they hold it, I recommend replacing the tires though if its been sitting with low air for a while.
5. Don't worry about incinerating the clutch, I learned on my FG2 (Si coupe). The good thing about having the CMC and slave cylinder that we do is that it is very friendly to learn on, they have damper valves so they don't release quickly like a regular clutch would, meaning if a new person is screwing up a clutch release it won't damage the clutch that much. I do recommend getting an em1 cmc and slave though once you learn. Check out videos on youtube about the CMC and slaves on our cars, it's informative and will ease your worries hopefully. The definitive CMC and slave cylinder thread | 9th Gen Civic Forum (The first post here explains it pretty well, 9th generation civics also have similar issues)
6. If there is pitting then yes, more importantly is how much material is left on the rotors and if there is scoring. Check the pads as well, but if you want a car that is tip top and will last, good to get in the groove of regular maintenance by replacing the brakes and rotors all at the same time just so its all in a rotation of time.
In closing, welcome to the family, ask any questions and I can hopefully help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
1. That's a big issue right there, do you really mean head bolt or valve cover bolt? He would have had to have the valve cover off to access the head bolt.
2. Check the cmc or slave, is this an si or an lx manual? I know the si have a very bad cmc and slave but haven't really heard of a leak from them, try checking your lines (Clean them off and refill the clutch fluid, might want to bleed it to make sure clean fluid is in the system)
3. Again, depends on sedan or coupe but here: Amazon.com: Dasbecan Clear Gray Right Passenger Side Sun Visor Compatible with Honda Civic 2006-2011 Replaces# 83230-SNA-A01ZC : Automotive
4. Check tires for dry rot or any signs that they are bad. If they don't have those signs, try filling with air and see if they hold it, I recommend replacing the tires though if its been sitting with low air for a while.
5. Don't worry about incinerating the clutch, I learned on my FG2 (Si coupe). The good thing about having the CMC and slave cylinder that we do is that it is very friendly to learn on, they have damper valves so they don't release quickly like a regular clutch would, meaning if a new person is screwing up a clutch release it won't damage the clutch that much. I do recommend getting an em1 cmc and slave though once you learn. Check out videos on youtube about the CMC and slaves on our cars, it's informative and will ease your worries hopefully. The definitive CMC and slave cylinder thread | 9th Gen Civic Forum (The first post here explains it pretty well, 9th generation civics also have similar issues)
6. If there is pitting then yes, more importantly is how much material is left on the rotors and if there is scoring. Check the pads as well, but if you want a car that is tip top and will last, good to get in the groove of regular maintenance by replacing the brakes and rotors all at the same time just so its all in a rotation of time.
In closing, welcome to the family, ask any questions and I can hopefully help!
It's an Si Sedan, and he snapped the cover bolt, not the head bolt itself.
 

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Luckily that bolt is just attached to a rod on the valve train, I think you should be able to replace that.
 

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Also there are 2 different type of threaded rods that are used, make sure its the right one you get
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Luckily that bolt is just attached to a rod on the valve train, I think you should be able to replace that.
Would temporarily running the engine like this damage it?
like just to make sure the car still runs before I sink any money into it.
 

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Running it with that snapped should really damage the engine, it just wouldn't have even pressure on the valve cover gasket so if anything, a small oil leak may form. As for removing the bolt, you'd have to remove the rest of the bolts, then once the valve cover is off, there is a nut connected to the threaded rod you should be able to get a wrench or ratchet on and loosen out of the valve train assembly. I would recommend not removing the valve cover until you have a valve cover gasket to replace it
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Running it with that snapped should really damage the engine, it just wouldn't have even pressure on the valve cover gasket so if anything, a small oil leak may form. As for removing the bolt, you'd have to remove the rest of the bolts, then once the valve cover is off, there is a nut connected to the threaded rod you should be able to get a wrench or ratchet on and loosen out of the valve train assembly. I would recommend not removing the valve cover until you have a valve cover gasket to replace it
When you say it may start leaking oil, do you mean out of the bolt hole, or a permanent leak elsewhere?
 

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Well yes out of the hole is possible but I meant because the gasket has uneven pressure it may leak a bit through the gasket. Those metal and rubber washer looking things are the seals to stop oil leaving the top up there, so without it a leak can form through that hole. Shouldn't really be an issue if you only run the car for a short amount of time to test if it runs.
 

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Can't you just clamp the post and remove it?? The R18 valve cover bolts are also known for snapping. Poor Honda fastener quality - they make them like this on purpose in order to make the cars as light as possible.
 

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Can't you just clamp the post and remove it?? The R18 valve cover bolts are also known for snapping. Poor Honda fastener quality - they make them like this on purpose in order to make the cars as light as possible.
No. The post is also a bolt for one of the cam caps. Have to take the cover off and swap the bolt out.
 
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