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Discussion Starter #1
I will be starting grad school this spring and had a few questions:

1. What is/was your major?
2. Did you work through grad school? If so, part or full time
3. Did you receive financial aid? If so was it enough to cover your expenses?
4. How difficult was your thesis or dissertation?
5. Any tips are welcomed!
 

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1. Doctorate in Pharmacy
2. Part time
3. Yes, but work helped too
4. not part of our program, a year's worth of rotations is our requirement
5. stick with it, make friends with ppl above you. they are the key to being successful
 

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Discussion Starter #3
bsramzy said:
1. Doctorate in Pharmacy
2. Part time
3. Yes, but work helped too
4. not part of our program, a year's worth of rotations is our requirement
5. stick with it, make friends with ppl above you. they are the key to being successful
Much thanks! Keep it coming people!
 

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CaliGuy said:
I will be starting grad school this spring and had a few questions:

1. What is/was your major?
2. Did you work through grad school? If so, part or full time
3. Did you receive financial aid? If so was it enough to cover your expenses?
4. How difficult was your thesis or dissertation?
5. Any tips are welcomed!
1. MBA
2. Yes, and yes
3. Yes, no
4. Not required (yay me)
5. For an MBA at least it is recommended you get some 'experience' under your belt before you do the program. There was a VAST difference between the experienced business folks getting their MBAs and the 22 year olds coming right out of their undergrad. None of the experienced folks wanted ANY of the undergrads in their work groups. Projects are harsh and real world experience goes a long way when you are doing business cases, over pure theory (aka, the Ivory Tower).

Great to hear the younguns' spout the latest and greatest, but application of that theory was a bit harder for them. Far too often theory only covers central ideas, and leaves out all of the other variables (at least at the level which is covered in college)...which is where the youger students typically got tripped up, not having had the experience of seeing first hand the complexity of 'real' marketing/sales/finance/accouting/Ops/etc., and how it works together in process streams.
 

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History PhD? Thinking of teaching? I don't have my masters (yet) but I'll answer.

1. Business Communications
2. Yes, full time.
3. Yes, I only borrowed enough for the classes. I had a full time job, so I relied on that for my income.
4. I don't know yet.
5. Good luck. Get to know your professors. Get to know your classmates. Like it was said before, these will be the people in your industry in a couple of years. They are your network.

Loans: I don't know if it's different for each state or not, but I was eligible for $4,000 subsidized (no interest until you graduate) and $12,000 unsub (interest starts immediately) for each semester. I don't remember how summer classes were factored in, but that's roughly $35,000 a year in loans. You'll use a lot of that for school. I would at least get a part time job if I were you. There's no reason to pay interest on those loans if you don't have to.
 

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CaliGuy said:
I will be starting grad school this spring and had a few questions:

1. What is/was your major?
2. Did you work through grad school? If so, part or full time
3. Did you receive financial aid? If so was it enough to cover your expenses?
4. How difficult was your thesis or dissertation?
5. Any tips are welcomed!
1. Industrial Architecture (mainly although i can do domestic too but i already graduated)/Going for law now as my 2nd major .
2. No, just an internship that never paid me.
3. No financial aid due to me getting 400 a week and family earning 100K+
4. no thesis just a portafolio here.
5. try to enter a program that has many applicants. Because those are the ones with the best professors and real small classes with close professor-student relations regarding your major. The first year adjustment will be difficult and be prepared for sleepless nights everyday for a couple of months. Set up an schedule and follow it. Adjust your time accordingly. Last but not least, good luck.
 

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CaliGuy said:
I will be starting grad school this spring and had a few questions:

1. Econ PhD
2. School stipend was more than enough, only worked as research assistant
3. See above
4. The hardest part is keeping your head in the game. As long as you don;t let the work intimidate you, you will rock it
5. Even if you are 1/64 of a particular race, apply for a scholarship for that race. May sound like a lousy thing to do, but the scholarship folks will be thrilled... trust me
 

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CaliGuy said:
I will be starting grad school this spring and had a few questions:

1. What is/was your major?
2. Did you work through grad school? If so, part or full time
3. Did you receive financial aid? If so was it enough to cover your expenses?
4. How difficult was your thesis or dissertation?
5. Any tips are welcomed!
1. Masters in Networking and Systems Administration, 6 classes to go
2. Working full time
3. I am taking out government loans, as well as having work pay for part.
4. Haven't done it yet, so I don't know
5. no real tips, except have fun taking classes. I know all of the classes that I have taken have all been really interesting, and WAY more fun than undergrad classes even though the grad classes are a lot more work.
 

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CaliGuy said:
I will be starting grad school this spring and had a few questions:

1. What is/was your major?
2. Did you work through grad school? If so, part or full time
3. Did you receive financial aid? If so was it enough to cover your expenses?
4. How difficult was your thesis or dissertation?
5. Any tips are welcomed!
1. Master of Professional Accountancy
2. Graduate Teaching Assistant. Required about 20 hours per week and paid for tuition plus $600 per month.
3. See above. Still had to pay for books, food, rent, car, gas, etc. Came out of school with tons of credit card debt... bad idea.
4. The MPA program was only an additional year (3 semesters) and did not require a thesis/dissertation. We did have a comprehensive oral exam at the end that required a ton of studying.
5. Stay out of credit card debt if you can. I'm still working to pay it off 2 years after school.
 

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Sorry I forget the order of the questions but here goes:

1) M.Sc in Organic Chemistry
2) No part time job, no time for it while doing research
3) No loans, got a stipend which wasnt a lot but enough to live on (with a roomate)
4) Thesis/dissertation was a PITA, had to write a huge technical paper on my research and then a formal defense which was actually pretty straight forward (but man was i stressed preparing for it)
5) I loved grad-school, made some great firends (from all over the world) and have lots of good memories, my only advice would be go for it!

Good luck.
 

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1. Starting with you, in the spring '08 semester (Double MBA, Strategic Management first, then Finance second, may decide to do the Doctorate after so I can teach junior college later on in life)
2. Yes, full time I will work
3. No financial aid, I will pay and my company reimburses
4. I don't have to write one
5. Before you start get it in your mind that you will finish no matter what. If this means sacrifices then you make them.
 

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1) MS Biology.
2) Yes and No - I got paid a stipend for my research.
3) Full tuition remission.
4) Written thesis, no oral defense.
5) Research the outlook for jobs in the field or forget it. No sense getting a degree no one much wants unless you just like being able to refer to yourself as "doctor."
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the info guys (and keep it coming!). I didn't realize we had to many Grad students/MA/MS/PhD's here...

To answer some of the above (in no particular order): I want to ultimately teach at the University level, so it won't be wasted schooling (as it may appear at first).

I made friends with many of my prof's as an undergrad, so I totally agree and realize about that...

I will be 1st obtaining my MA from Cal State Northridge and then applying for a PhD program (don't know where yet---this decision will be critical though).

I won't be working---hoping I can get enough in student loans to pay for everything (mom just told me she would pay my tuition--at least for a while---thanks mom!)

I'm studying for the GRE (general test) right now...I'll be taking it next week:pray:

No humanities majors here?:xyxnervou
 

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CaliGuy said:
Cal State Northridge
Why not apply to a top program in history from the get-go? I have really fond memories of the department at berkeley. I had a buddy who did what you are doing; masters at a small school, then phd in history. He got into princeton and wanted to study baseball history, but he burned out after 1 year. Be careful not to burn out doing the masters.
 
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