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I pulled my emergency break all the way up, when I put it back down it seemed fine but when I for example go over a speedbump the lever lifts up and catches, never had problems before, any suggestions on what to do
 

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Check on the rear wheel hub area with the wheels off. See if the parking brake wire got snagged on the suspension or possibly if the spring is stuck on something. The spring is attached to the lower wire heading to the brake caliper, should be easy to spot. Parking brake is mechanical so it should be easier to diagnose than an electric parking brake.
 

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Hi guys, I will reuse this thread.
I have an 08 civic. Few days ago I came home and there was this weird smell, one rear brake was super hot. I checked and found out that the return spring for hand brake cable is missing. Any idea where to get one?
How hard is it to replace it?

Thanks!
 

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Pretty sure that's a dealer part. If that, you might have to buy a caliper;

You might be able to get one from a salvage yard with a caliper.
 

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So I ordered the part, patched it up temporarily. However, almost new disc warped :-/
On top of that one of the 5 threads holding the wheel is partially striped (IMO it had been like that, was very hard to remove the nut)
Is that something for a DIY fix?
 

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So I ordered the part, patched it up temporarily. However, almost new disc warped :-/
On top of that one of the 5 threads holding the wheel is partially striped (IMO it had been like that, was very hard to remove the nut)
Is that something for a DIY fix?
Re: stripped threads. Yes. Remove the disc. Drive out the old stud (put the disk on wood like plywood while doing this). Then insert the new stud. You can drive it in (use 2 x 4"s on their sides to support the disc.

Or you can take it to a good shop (usually local auto parts stores, sometimes O'Reilly's, not AutoZone) that have a machine shop service, and then can press it out and press in a new stud for around $20.
Where did you get the new disc? You should have that turned flat or replace it. Don't use a warped disc.
 

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I live in TX, bought the Civic up north, drove it here in Dec.
The story is sad because Firestone changed the rear brakes before I bought it (discs, pads, calipers), they also changed the brake fluid, supposedly. Unfortunately, their warranty does not transfer to the new owner, I tried.
IMO they use shitty parts and did shitty job. The brakes were not bled properly. Front calipers are old and rusted neither me nor a professional shop could break the bleeder valves.

The disc is slightly warped, I keep checking the temperature and it is not overheating as before. It's perhaps few degrees hotter than the right side.

I tried to disassemble the brake but could not even break the two screws holding pads. I have Kobalt tools but the wrench is too short, I need more leverage.
Any suggestions what and where to get?
My Kobalt nuts from 12 up are 3/8 and the smaller ones are 1/4.

We also have an 06 Ody, I could not break the nut to drain the oil. I need to update my equipment, I have just a black jack set from Walmart and it barely gets the tire off the ground when maxed out. I ought to return it and get something better.

I appreciate your advice.
 

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Okay, that's a big ask.

First off, AutoZone, O'Reilly's and others will loan you tools - for free.
So if money is tight, go that route. You'll have to leave a credit card deposit (their hook to make sure the tools return.

I have a ton of tools, and every time I use one, I have to remind my wife WHY I HAVE SO MANY. Good tools are like good friends - you miss them when they are gone.

Cobalt is okay as a tool line. Craftsman, Matco, Snap-On are better / stronger.

If I were you, I'd go to Ace Hardware and pick up the tools you need, or Home Depot. Both stock Craftsman stuff now.

Craftsman has a lifetime warranty as well.

For my jack, I have 2 - a Craftsman my wife got me - a ton and a half, and one I grabbed from her father when he went into nursing care - a nice 3 ton unit he used to use on his old Lincoln Continental. I can pick the front of my Civic Hybrid enough to get in and replace the upper O2 sensor (and anyone knows what a bear that is to reach on the back side of the engine).

Jack stands are a must.

You say you are north - North where? If you are local, I can help you. I'm in Rochelle, Illinois.

For stuff that is rust-locked, I use SeaFoam penetrating oil, or CRC 636. It works on O2 sensors and anything else. Spray on, gently tap it with a dead blow hammer, wait 30 minutes, and try to get it off.

I also have a Dremel tool with wire wheels I use to get corrosion off calipers.
 

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Thanks for your advice.

I am in Texas, I got the Civic about 1hr from Chicago. The car has some rust but not on the rear calipers (brakes) as they are new. I believe they just winged it at Firestone and did not use torque wrench. Should be around 20. That is why I can't break it loose.

I didn't know they loan tools for free. I will try that before I buy anything new.

We also have a Harbor Freight neaby, are they any good?

I am new to Honda and new to this. In the past I would do things on cars that don't require lifting, I have done a lot of bike maintenance and also lawn mowers :)

Thanks and have a nice weekend!
 

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Thanks for your advice.

I am in Texas, I got the Civic about 1hr from Chicago. The car has some rust but not on the rear calipers (brakes) as they are new. I believe they just winged it at Firestone and did not use torque wrench. Should be around 20. That is why I can't break it loose.

I didn't know they loan tools for free. I will try that before I buy anything new.

We also have a Harbor Freight neaby, are they any good?

I am new to Honda and new to this. In the past I would do things on cars that don't require lifting, I have done a lot of bike maintenance and also lawn mowers :)

Thanks and have a nice weekend!
Harbor Freight - Not good. Disposable quality tools.

I buy tools for life.

As far as AutoZone (etc), you can even get a breaker bar. For example, I was attending a referee clinic in Southern Illinois, and my daughter called - her car wouldn't back up. Turns out the right rear drum brake on her Chevy Aveo dropped a pad which jammed when she tried to back up. I had some tools with me (lucky coincidence) - my main mechanical box, but I didn't have a big enough socket or breaker bar (don't carry those with me) to get the bearing cap off. Anyway, I picked up all of that at AutoZone. But I still couldn't budge the drum.

Then the wedge idea hit me. We put the wheel back on, and I had her creep forward. Drum came right off, did a quick brake job replacing her pads, adjusted the take up wheel to make sure the drum was just about tight on the pads, and put everything back together.

Civics are easy to work on. I would get a universal joint with the sockets you need. Some of the stuff on the disc brakes can be hard to get to.

Let me know if you can't get it done. I have a heated garage.
 

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Hi ArcadeTechGW
Thanks for your support.
I have managed to buy some tools in Goodwill and have successfully changed the oil on the Ody. Had to run to Walmart for oil filter wrench tho. I guess shops just use tools all the time and don't care much about torque.

I will leave the Civic for now, maybe will take a picture and ask for your opinion.

What I would like to share is my experience putting SeaFoam to regular gas. I did not see any difference. Then I tried 93 fuel and that works better with both cars. At least that is what I think :) Maybe I am just imagining it.

All the best!
 

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Do you mean the two screws holding the rotor to the knuckle? They should be Philips heads if you mean those, If they're stuck I recommend heat, especially since those set screws are so small if you add to much torque and they are rusted tight you might snap them. Use a torch and heat up mainly the screws and if you still have something to grab on for the Philips screws use a quarter inch ratchet to quarter inch six point and put in a bit that you know fits well in the head of the screw. If you mean the two bolts that hold the calipers up to the knuckle then also heat. Heat is your friend for stuck bolts, helps free up the rust a lil bit and makes it easy to remove, just avoid it around rubber parts obviously.
 

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Do you mean the two screws holding the rotor to the knuckle? They should be Philips heads if you mean those, If they're stuck I recommend heat, especially since those set screws are so small if you add to much torque and they are rusted tight you might snap them. Use a torch and heat up mainly the screws and if you still have something to grab on for the Philips screws use a quarter inch ratchet to quarter inch six point and put in a bit that you know fits well in the head of the screw. If you mean the two bolts that hold the calipers up to the knuckle then also heat. Heat is your friend for stuck bolts, helps free up the rust a lil bit and makes it easy to remove, just avoid it around rubber parts obviously.
If I have a stuck screw, I get out my impact screwdriver. You set the head in the screw, and hit it with a hammer. It moves a little on every strike. Gets them every time. Much better than heat.
 

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Hi ArcadeTechGW
Thanks for your support.
I have managed to buy some tools in Goodwill and have successfully changed the oil on the Ody. Had to run to Walmart for oil filter wrench tho. I guess shops just use tools all the time and don't care much about torque.

I will leave the Civic for now, maybe will take a picture and ask for your opinion.

What I would like to share is my experience putting SeaFoam to regular gas. I did not see any difference. Then I tried 93 fuel and that works better with both cars. At least that is what I think :) Maybe I am just imagining it.

All the best!
There are many types of SeaFoam. You are looking for the rust buster type.

I don't use engine additives. They try to help, but really don't help much at all. When an engine is worn, it's worn. You lose compression in the rings, which causes blow by at high power. Which means lost torque and power.

Oil changes are the key to making an engine survive. I had a Mitsubishi Galant Sigma with a 3 liter V-6 that I changed the oil on every 3000 miles. At 150,000 miles, we lifted the heads and there was no piston ridge on the cylinders - at all.

The problem is once the engine is worn, your only choice is to overhaul it. You bore out the cylinders, install oversized pistons and rings, and break the engine in again.

Or find a car that got rear ended and totaled early in life, and grab a fresh engine out of that.
 
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