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Discussion Starter #1
I'm here to tell you that you don't need to re-install rotor screws.

My 08 Si is the first vehicle that has had these tiny screws in the rotor assembly. I've done brake and suspension jobs on my Ford Ranger, Subaru Legacy, my dad's MR2, Mom's Chrysler Town and Country, and none of them have had these two tiny, extremely seized, Rotor screws.
At first, I was worried. "How am I going to be able to start my Wheel bearing job when I don't have replacement screws?" "I can't re-use the screws because the corrosion over the past 12 years has made it impossible to get these guys out without destroying them."
Then it hit me... the reason I've never seen these screws prior is because they are completely unnecessary. During production, they make it easier for employees, or robots or whatever, to install the caliper. Not only do the wheel lugs hold the wheel to your rotor to your hub assembly, but the bolt pattern alone keeps your rotor from spinning around.
So no need to fret fellow DIY'ers, once you remove those screws, consider it a permanent upgrade to make every job easier. Plenty of YouTube support on how to remove them as well. Don't replace them.

Let me know if anyone thinks these screws are necessary or if this helped.
 

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The first time I did my rotors, i said the same thing. Mine screws were a BEEEATCHHH to take out, but I did put anti-seize on the new screws and I've never had a problem since. My ride is an '07 Sedan with 290,000 miles. So, yeah, you don't HAVE to put in the screws. They are supposedly put on so they don't come off when you are working while the wheels are off. But yeah, I feel your pain, LOL
 

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Yeah man. I figured it'd be good to get the word out there for other people in the same situation, and possibly save them SOME aggravation. It's still difficult to remove them, but yeah.
 

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My screwdriver of choice for this:



The screw heads on our Hondas are not Philips, but are similar looking JIS heads. Using the wrong head screwdriver when trying to remove a tight screw makes it more likely to strip out the screw head. An impact driver helps to counter the Philips driver's natural tendancy to chew out a JIS head, but I prefer to not fight the mismatched head battle in the first place and start with a JIS driver. Having an impact driver to back the correct head is icing on the cake.
 

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My screwdriver of choice for this:



The screw heads on our Hondas are not Philips, but are similar looking JIS heads. Using the wrong head screwdriver when trying to remove a tight screw makes it more likely to strip out the screw head. An impact driver helps to counter the Philips driver's natural tendancy to chew out a JIS head, but I prefer to not fight the mismatched head battle in the first place and start with a JIS driver. Having an impact driver to back the correct head is icing on the cake.
Great info! (y)
 

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I'm here to tell you that you don't need to re-install rotor screws.

My 08 Si is the first vehicle that has had these tiny screws in the rotor assembly. I've done brake and suspension jobs on my Ford Ranger, Subaru Legacy, my dad's MR2, Mom's Chrysler Town and Country, and none of them have had these two tiny, extremely seized, Rotor screws.
At first, I was worried. "How am I going to be able to start my Wheel bearing job when I don't have replacement screws?" "I can't re-use the screws because the corrosion over the past 12 years has made it impossible to get these guys out without destroying them."
Then it hit me... the reason I've never seen these screws prior is because they are completely unnecessary. During production, they make it easier for employees, or robots or whatever, to install the caliper. Not only do the wheel lugs hold the wheel to your rotor to your hub assembly, but the bolt pattern alone keeps your rotor from spinning around.
So no need to fret fellow DIY'ers, once you remove those screws, consider it a permanent upgrade to make every job easier. Plenty of YouTube support on how to remove them as well. Don't replace them.

Let me know if anyone thinks these screws are necessary or if this helped.
You are Correct...they DO NOT NEED TO BE REPLACED.... the Rotor Screws are ONLY IN PLACE to keep the rotor properly positioned while going through the assembly line, they are Not Required... Do Yourselves a Favor and remove and Don't replace or put original screws back on when You are doing Your next job concerning the removal of the rotors.... Sadly they Can be found online for sale which confuses some into believing They are required even though they aren't.
 

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If you tend to be a bit of a perfectionist, and prefer them. Just use anti-seize and the appropriate #3 JIS screwdriver. Stainless steel replacements are available on Amazon ?
 

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Yes anti seize and new screws for me. Just makes assembly easier when rotor isn’t wobbling about when installing the caliper. BTW same screws are used across a number of different Hondas.


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