8th Generation Honda Civic Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This DIY covers the replacement of the R18 engine water pump. The job was done on a 2007 Civic LX with manual transmission. At 7 years old and approximately 35K miles I started noticing a few drops of coolant on my garage floor. I posted this thread and the responses concerned me so I took the car to the dealer:

http://www.8thcivic.com/forums/mechanical-problems-technical-chat/515625-coolant-leak-how-concerned-should-i.html#post15117553

The dealer reported no engine block cracking but did inform me that my water pump required replacement. The quote (with tax) was about $600. Being cheap and a DIYer i decided to do some research and try it myself. Surprisingly, other than a mention here/there on these forums and a short video on Youtube the only source of info I could find about how to do this was that from an ESM. The ESM was very helpful but was lacking in details as to how to accomplish specific tasks that a mechanic would already know how to do ... so I had to figure out the details myself.


Here we go:




Step 1: Start the engine. Set the heater temperature control dial to maximum heat, then turn off the ignition switch. Make sure the engine and radiator are cool to the touch. Put a pan that holds at least 2 gallons under the radiator and open the valve at the bottom (counterclockwise). Drain the coolant.






Step 2: Prepare to remove alternator. Please reference the photo below. Remove connectors 1,2 and 3 (easy) from alternator. Locate hex attachment on belt tensioner. You will have to use a serpentine belt tensioner removal tool, a 19mm box end wrench or a 19mm crowfoot on the end of a breaker bar. You will be pushing forward (towards back of engine) to de-tension the serpentine. You MUST push slowly as you can damage the hydraulic tensioner. Be careful of the A/C line to the left and the motor mount that will limit just how much leverage you can get on the hex attachment. Once the belt is free remove it from the alternator pulley.





Step 3: Remove alternator: Remove remaining connectors as shown. Using a 12mm socket remove the upper/long bolt and the shorter lower bolt as shown.








Step 4: Remove the belt tensioner. Removing the tensioner was both very easy and the hardest part of the job. The exposed 12mm bolt at the hydraulic piston is a breeze to remove. The tensioner is anchored by the 12mm but it pivots on an 8mm allen hex head bolt underneath the water pump pulley. it took a 3/8 inch ratchet with an 8mm hex socket AND a hunk of pipe to get it loose. Once that comes out remove the tensioner.




Tensioner removed:





Step 5: Remove WP pulley. The ESM clearly states to loosen the three (3) 10mm WP pulley bolts before belt removal. I attempted this to no avail as the pulley would slip against the belt. I waited until this point to remove the bolts. To do this I inserted a screwdriver as shown and easily removed the bolts:





Step 6: Remove the water pump. IMHO once you get past the tensioner the rest of this job is pretty straightforward. In this step you remove the five (5) 10mm bolts holding the WP to the block. Recommend that you place your coolant pan under the WP as once removed about 2 cups of coolant splashed over the wheel well and under the engine.










From here on out just backtrack and reinstall everything that you removed in reverse order. The WP goes on very easily as it has an O-ring and no sealant is required. The tensioner and pulley are much easier IMHO to install than to remove. Reinstall your alternator and reconnect all connectors. The only difficult part of re-assembly (IMHO) was getting the serpentine belt back on (3 tries). Once the belt is on and tensioned you just follow the standard process to refill the radiator. Remember to be gentle with the tensioner.



The dealer was going to charge me $165 for a new WP but I was able to find an OEM (AISIN) unit on ebay for $35. I bought the coolant for about $17.50 per gallon at the dealer. While I was at it I also replaced both upper and lower radiator hoses and the thermostat which added about $27 to the job. Total material costs totaled a little less than $100.

The dealer appeared to be charging me about 4 hours labor for just the WP. I estimate it took me about 5 hours to complete the whole job, including disposing of the old coolant.

I hope you find this DIY useful. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
do you think this process is similar for the si


If you have an 06 Si then you have the K20Z3 engine. The water pump may actually be easier to replace because it looks like the alternator is located below the water pump and you do not have a long serpentine to deal with. My guess is that you remove the tensioner and just remove/replace the water pump. The clearances for the R18 are pretty tight so there may/may not be an issue with actually being able to get to the water pump on the K20Z3.

Search the forums here for more info. If you do not find what you are seeking try the K20 forums here:


K20A.org .:. The K Series Source . Honda / Acura K20a k24a Engine Forum - Powered by vBulletin


Good luck ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Last weekend pretty much followed a DIY for a nst pulley kit install which showed me how to remove the radiator support beam and how to remove the alternator to get access to the water pump once I removed all of the parts it looked like my water pump wasn’t even leaking coolant but I think its leaking from the back of the water pump passage way. I also took apart the thermostat thinking that the seal that connects to the block was bad it turned out that it wasn’t. After removing that in the corner behind the thermostat there was coolant leaking. Where was your water pump leaking from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Last weekend pretty much followed a DIY for a nst pulley kit install which showed me how to remove the radiator support beam and how to remove the alternator to get access to the water pump once I removed all of the parts it looked like my water pump wasn’t even leaking coolant but I think its leaking from the back of the water pump passage way. I also took apart the thermostat thinking that the seal that connects to the block was bad it turned out that it wasn’t. After removing that in the corner behind the thermostat there was coolant leaking. Where was your water pump leaking from?


The pump was leaking from the weep hole. The leak was minimal and the pump would probably been good for many more miles but I had the time and the energy so I decided to take a whack at it ... And glad I did.

Glad to hear that you located and fixed the leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I plan to change the water pump soon on my wife's 2008 Civic. I am afraid of possibly breaking the 8mm allen hex head bolt that the tensioner pivots on, if I find it is stuck. Do you think this could be an issue? Also, do you have enough room with that AC line that seems to very close by also? Seems like once you get the alternator removed it frees up some space to work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I plan to change the water pump soon on my wife's 2008 Civic. I am afraid of possibly breaking the 8mm allen hex head bolt that the tensioner pivots on, if I find it is stuck. Do you think this could be an issue? Also, do you have enough room with that AC line that seems to very close by also? Seems like once you get the alternator removed it frees up some space to work.

The 8mm allen hex bolt was the one fastener that concerned me the most when I researched the job. There is always the chance that you will tear the head off of a fastener ... but it must be done in order to get to the water pump. When I attempted it I tried (carefully) to remove the allen hex using a simple socket but it was put on very tight (as in over-torqued) at the factory. I was able to break the bolt by using a pipe over the ratchet, giving my more torque. There are ways to mitigate your risk here. You can purchase a second bolt from Honda so you have a spare if you do tear the original bolt head off. You might even try a spray solution on the bolt and let it soak.

There is enough room to de-tension the serpentine IF you have the right tools. Try using a ratcheting breaker bar with a crows foot on the end. Use a pipe if you need to to SLOWLY compress the cylinder using that hex head. I used my shoulder a bit and my left hand to remove the serpentine. Make sure that your socket/crows foot does not slip or you could damage that AC line.

You are correct. That area of the engine bay is especially tight. Removing the alternator really provides a lot of workspace.

Other things I may not have mentioned in my writeup:

- I like the fact that the water pump does not require sealant. The supplied O-ring seals very nicely.

- Once you get the 8mm allen hex bolt out you are just about done as the rest of the job is easy. Make sure that you use a quality hex socket when you attempt removal as you don't want this failing on you. Funny, but I bought an inexpensive set at HF and they worked fin.

- Consider replacing your radiator hoses and thermostat when you try this job if they are original. You will have most of the coolant out already and it really isn't that difficult.

- Take pictures of your setup if you are at all concerned about putting things back together correctly.


Good luck ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
worried I stripped my tensioner bolt

the alternator is off, but I just cant get the tensioner off. Worse yet, I think it might be stripped now. I've tried letting a solvent soak on the 8mm allen bolt, I've tried tapping it, and I've tried getting more leverage, but it's just so shallow, everything seems to just roll out, slowly stripping it while doing so.

I'm really worried that now I am at a point where I'll have to drill the bolt out, but there's no straight forward access (I've already taken off the tire and plastic panelling on the passenger side and it's still slightly angled).

Any help would be greatly appreciated. In my research I've seen that maybe it's possible to detach that side of the engine from the frame, lowering it a bit and allowing the straight in access require to use a left handed drill to bore the bolt out? Is this my best bet? If so how would I do that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Good write up, thanks. I read the TSB 09-007 about tensioner bolt and it says the bolt has to be torqued to exactly 40 lb-ft. Did you use a torque wrench to put it back together? How's it holding up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Thanks for this diy. I plan on tackling the water pump soon seeing as I have too many miles on the stock one. Does anyone recommend the Gates water pump?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I know this is an old thread, but does anyone know how many gallons of honda coolant would I need for the waterpump replacement? I am assuming 1 in reference to the picture above. Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Its under two gallons (two jugs of the stuff) to replace the entire volume of the system including the reservoir bottle, frankly its better to just drain the system and fill with fresh coolant than try to work in their with the blue stuff dribbling out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
And you can actually pull the tensioner and remove just the pulley itself if it's making noise using the same t50 torx socket. The pulley is cheaper than replacing the entire assembly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I take it that you were actually successful in removing that 8mm socket without any hardship? Or did you use some kind of loosening spray before attempting to remove? Appreciate a reply as I am trying to replace the water pump on my own as I cannot afford to pay a mechanic to do it withe quote being $500 out the door. Thanks.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top