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Surprisingly I have found very little information on how to replace your PCV valve. It's location: Looking at your engine, left (passenger), behind the valve cover. Taking a clear picture of it was very difficult so I took the best pics I could while doing this. It is a cheap part (about $12), that doesn't normally die, however it is cheap and KINDA easy to do. I'm very religious when it comes to maintenance, but this is an item I always forget about. Hope these pics and instructions help anyone who wants to do this yourself.

Symptons: Nothing, not even a code
Why replace: cheap part, not terribly difficult to do. I saw A LOT of "gunk" (accumulated oil/dirt) near the valve. Looked ominous (having oil built up like this pointed to a leak, so it seems logical that the valve needed to be replaced. Cheap insurance never hurt anyone.

Tools/parts:
1) 1 universal joint (I used a 3/8" ratchet)
2) short extension
3) long extension
4) 11/16" deep socket (used to get PCV valve in/out)
5) needle nose pliers (if you have bent-tip pliers, even better)
6) Ratchet (duh)
7) Long flat head screw driver
8) Can of PB Blaster
9) Bottle of engine degreaser (anyone will do)
10) Rag
11) 1 brand new PCV Valve (Honda part# HP17130-PND-A01, Valve Assy, PCV)
12) 14 mm crush washer (same as oil drain plug)
13) Water hose (to hose off PB blaster and degreaser)
14) Beer (optional).

My R18 sedan had about 158,000 miles on it when I did this and the PCV valve had never been replaced. I get upper 30s mpg and have no issues. She travels about 110 miles a day.

Here we go:

As mentioned, the PCV valve is located behind the valve cover on the passenger side of the engine. You can't see it when looking at it directly, but you will see the hose that is clamped onto it.

See the green clip? Unhook that to have access to the tube leading to the PCV valve.


After degreasing only this section of the motor, I'm pointing to the tube in question.


Here is another view of the hose with the PCV below it (middle of pic).


Here you will see a metal bracket used to align attached wires and hoses. It is bolted to the motor by a 10mm bolt that faces the firewall. I couldn't get to it for the life of me (didn't have the proper tools), but I bent it out of the way and bent it back when I was finished. If you can remove it, better, if not, my way will help. Note: you HAVE to get it out of the way to access the hose and valve.


Here's a better look at the clamp you must pinch and slide upward. This is where your bent-tip pliers will come in handy. Before you remove the hose, spray a little PB Blaster to loosen up the PCV. I let it sit for about 10 mintues before I hosed it off, then went in with my tools to get it out.


Position your tools:


Old PCV valve was in tight, but came out easily enough. Here is what it looked like. Anyway, When you take it out, you will notice a crush washer sitting (unless you are lucky enough to have it come out with the valve) where the valve sat. I took a long flat head screw driver and tapped the end of it to loosen this washer. Worked like charm.

Out:


Crush washer (stayed on the engine block):


Take your rag and wipe area as best you can. I'm not sure when the next time I'll have to replace the PCV valve, so it might be in there for another few years, so I like to use anti-seize on the threads to avoid aggravation in the future. Get some anti-seize (see pic) and spread it around the threads. Position the your new crush washer and finger tighten the valve into position.


After you tighten the PCV valve, place the hose onto it and use your pliers to clamp the hose toward the end. Next, bend (or reattach) the metal bracket back into place. Re-clip the green holder and you are done!


Feel free to drink your (optional) beer and enjoy. I can't say for certainty that I prevented certain engine damage, but it's so cheap and I have a lot of miles on my rig, so this can't hurt it in the least.

Hope this helps anyone with an R18! :dancingcoolsmiley:
 

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I had one heck of a time getting mine replaced. (I reckon that's what I get for doing it a few weeks after having a stroke) I replaced the PCV hose because it seemed very brittle for only having 66k on it.

I bent the bracket also. Much easier than trying to get the proper tools in that tight space.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I had one heck of a time getting mine replaced. (I reckon that's what I get for doing it a few weeks after having a stroke) I replaced the PCV hose because it seemed very brittle for only having 66k on it.

I bent the bracket also. Much easier than trying to get the proper tools in that tight space.
Stroke? Holy crap, hope you are ok. Anyway, the little information I found on this told everyone that it was extremely easy. Nope. If one dive's into this project thinking that (I thought it was going to take 5 minutes................. it will now that I know how to do it, LOL), you are in for a surprise b/c it's a little involving.

What I should've mentioned also, is to work on it when the engine is cool or you are going to burn your hands.

I still can't really find how beneficial this is to do, I know in older cars, this was a maintenance item that needed to be replaced with regularity.
 

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Unfortunately, yes. I had a mild stroke on March 23rd. I'm much better now and with continued PT I hope to regain the mobility I lost.

Anyways...

In regards to the necessity of changing the PCV, mine was simply clogged up with gunk. Once I finally got it removed, I could barely get it to shake. Instead of attempting to clean it, I chose to replace it.

Two things made me look into replacing the PCV. One, I had P0172 DTC pop up and wasn't able to find fault with the usual suspects. Two, my car backfired when I was backing out of a parking space right after it stalled.

I did search on this site for a "how to" but to no avail. Kudos for writing one up, it should make it much easier for others to complete the task.
 

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Thanks for the post. I can't tell you how many mechanics could not find my PCV valve or would just blow me off and say "that's not really a serviceable part" My 2008 Civic LX has had some rough idle issues and also poor gas mileage lately. I am going down a list of potential suspects and doing most of it myself and the valve came up. Thanks to your post, I easily replaced it yesterday!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the post. I can't tell you how many mechanics could not find my PCV valve or would just blow me off and say "that's not really a serviceable part" My 2008 Civic LX has had some rough idle issues and also poor gas mileage lately. I am going down a list of potential suspects and doing most of it myself and the valve came up. Thanks to your post, I easily replaced it yesterday!
Glad I could help! The PCV is a pain to get to, but not terribly difficult. I'm surprised no one made a DIY before! Has it helped your MPG/rough idle?
 

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Thanks for the post. I can't tell you how many mechanics could not find my PCV valve or would just blow me off and say "that's not really a serviceable part" My 2008 Civic LX has had some rough idle issues and also poor gas mileage lately. I am going down a list of potential suspects and doing most of it myself and the valve came up. Thanks to your post, I easily replaced it yesterday!
So did new PCV help your rough idle & poor MPG?? :waiting:
 

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Just for fun, how much did your PCV valve cost you? Mine cost me $26 CAD for the part only. Usually PCV valves are inexpensive ($6-$7).
 

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Just for fun, how much did your PCV valve cost you? Mine cost me $26 CAD for the part only. Usually PCV valves are inexpensive ($6-$7).
Honda Part: HP17130-PND-A01, retails for $22.45. I found it for US$15.04 (hondaautomotiveparts.com). I got mine from partznet, but can't remember exactly how much I paid for it.
 

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When attempting to remove old PCV valve, does the rubber hose pull off easily after the clamp is removed? Or do you have to pry up the bottom of the hose where it is flush with the PCV washer?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When attempting to remove old PCV valve, does the rubber hose pull off easily after the clamp is removed? Or do you have to pry up the bottom of the hose where it is flush with the PCV washer?
I remember it was sort of tight. I just pulled and it came off. No prying was need, at least for me.
 

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Thanks.

I'm surprised the socket size to R&R the PCV valve is 11/16", since most every bolt & nut on this car has metric measurements. 11/16" = 17.5mm.
 

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Any tips on removing the rubber hose from the PCV valve? Should I pry it up from the bottom using a flat blade screwdriver as I pull up on it? Or should I just grab the hose & pull up, although it seems like it is on there awfully tight? Or should I put a rag on the hose, grab with pliers, then pull?
 

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Anyone break their pcv valve? I bought an OEM PCV valve, got the old one off no problem....went to put the new one in...torque wench set to 33 ft lbs as per manual and the SOB snapped in half. I did second guess that torque spec and looked it up in various plaves as it seemed a little high to me. Well...the entire threaded section is now inside the head. I JB WELDED it for the time being and car is running fine but I dont know what to do.

I dont know if I can extract it but I sure will need to pull the valve out (spring pulls right out) and break it in the process in order to get an extractor in, at which point I have no choice but to extract it. And if I cant...Im ******. I could drill it out and put in a helicoil or time-sert but I doubt there is enough space to get a drill in. Never mind that Id be getting metal shards into the engine.

Anyone have any exerience with a broken PCV?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Good luck with the extraction, that really sucks. Sounds like you are mechanically inclined, but otherwise I would head to a mechanic or a dealer to help ya out.

When I installed the new one, I didn't use a torque wrench, I just tightened it until it was firm (for me). I don't believe it's a huge deal, however it were a valve/cam bolt, then yes, it is imperative one uses one. Anyway, mine is still fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Why replace the PCV valve? What are the symptoms ? Asking because Im curious.
Read above. No symptoms. Cheap insurance. Mine was very dirty, yet working. I drive 120 miles/day and like to keep my car in A1 shape. Just wanted to share.
 
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