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Thanks for this DIY it helped in many ways. Only problem is I cant get my ecu sitting right anymore gotta work on that and one bold on the pasanger isnt threading all the way in for some reason. :/ But other than that it went smoothly
 

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Awesome DIY I'll be using this in a week or so when I have time to install my 70a kit. Already have the rear mount installed so hopefully the other 2 won't give me too much trouble. Thanks for taking the time and making this for us becuase the directions hasport supplies are junk to say the least. :thumbsup: +1 imaginary rep for you good sir


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Awesome DIY I'll be using this in a week or so when I have time to install my 70a kit. Already have the rear mount installed so hopefully the other 2 won't give me too much trouble. Thanks for taking the time and making this for us becuase the directions hasport supplies are junk to say the least. :thumbsup: +1 imaginary rep for you good sir


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It will likely make things easier for you if you unbolt the rear mount from the bracket on the oil pan to allow the engine to move around a bit more while getting the others in place.
 

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Thanks for this DIY! Soo helpful. I bought the mounts used and did not have any of the original instructions.

Just installed all my mounts and the car shifts and drives so much better! Could not of done it without your DIY. Thanks again man. Took me 9 friggin hours lol.
 

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Thanks for this DIY! Soo helpful. I bought the mounts used and did not have any of the original instructions.

Just installed all my mounts and the car shifts and drives so much better! Could not of done it without your DIY. Thanks again man. Took me 9 friggin hours lol.
Also just a tip for the Rear mount, this has probably been stated before but, you need to get the bolt in on the engine first, then line what you do is use the engine weight up and down to force the engine mount into the subframe. This is how you get it in. After you get it into the subframe use a little prying tool like a screwdriver to position the mount and get the bolt in properly. This took me about 1.5hrs to figure out lol.
 

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This should also be stated every page or so. Some mounts need to be shaved down to fit into the frame of the car. Mine got stuck half way in and I almost cried.
 

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This should also be stated every page or so. Some mounts need to be shaved down to fit into the frame of the car. Mine got stuck half way in and I almost cried.
I did not shave mine at all. It got stuck half way and I tried to pry it in for like an hour. Then I mounted it to the engine while it was half way into the subframe, and jack up and lower the engine and this will force it into the subframe.
 

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I did not shave mine at all. It got stuck half way and I tried to pry it in for like an hour. Then I mounted it to the engine while it was half way into the subframe, and jack up and lower the engine and this will force it into the subframe.
I tried that. It wasn't budging. I pried it out with a socket extension. Once I finally got it in and bolted up, the front mount bushing was twisted sideways. Very few things I do goes without something else happening to add a couple hours to the install time.
 

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Tried putting on the rear mount today, somehow me and my buddy jacked up the engine a little too much and the dog bone and hydraulic mount on the passenger side broke :( fml now I have to buy new mounts for that side and the rear mount isn't going in, we had to use a razor blade to shave off pieces of the mount to get the rear to fit in. Waiting on the replacement mounts to come in until I can bolt everything up waiting until 5pm for them to come in. This day has gone so bad for me hopefully nothing else breaks.
 

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so i used this diy to install three injected mounts. i didnt find it very hard at all. i supported the engine with a jack and unbolted the front mount and top dogbone and removed them. then i unbolted the rear mount and used the jack to rock the engine back to remove the rear mount. i bolted the rear mount to the subframe then used a prybar and my weight to reposition the engine and rebolted all the mounts. it was pretty straigtforward this way.
 

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Installed these engine mounts a few days ago with a friend using this diy and it was pretty straight forward i think i had an older set of the hasport mounts if thats possible. The rear mount was circular than the one in this diy so had a harder time putting the rear mount in. I also had to shave a little bit of the mount at the bottom where the bolt slides through the rear moount.I used some chassis grease to put the mount in and it worked. The rest of the mounts where pretty easy took me about 4 hours with some technical diffculties and moving of the engine. Very pleased with the outcome
 

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Note to mods: I didn't have permissions to access the DIY forum. Please move this there or wherever else it belongs. Thanks!

Hi all, this is my first attempt at a DIY. I’ve used many other peoples’ DIYs and they have been super helpful, so I thought I would try and give back to the community. I’m a definite noob when it comes to working on cars, especially compared to some of the others around here, so don’t bash me if I do something stupid! I welcome constructive criticism and suggestions for better ways to do things . I hope others find this helpful!

Alright, so to start I put the front of the car up on jack stands, and removed the air intake, battery, and ECU/bracket. I didn’t document those steps with pics, it’s not hard, but if you have questions feel free to ask.

** NOTE ** if you are only doing the rear mount, you don't need to remove all of this stuff! Only if you are doing the full set of three mounts!
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Here’s the engine bay with all that stuff removed
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The order that you put the mounts on, according to Hasport’s instructions, is: (1) rear torque mount, (2) left-hand (tranny side) mount, and (3) right-hand (passenger side) mount.

Before starting on the rear mount, take the bolt out of the front mount so that the engine will be able to rock back and forth. Here’s a picture of the front mount, viewed from the top through the engine bay… you won’t really be able to get to it from here, but it’s dirt simple from underneath.
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Here is a couple of pics of the front mount nut and bolt (17mm I believe) that you’ll be removing, viewed from underneath. Only take out the bolt that goes through the bracket attached to the frame:
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Here’s the nut and bolt removed… don’t take the actual mount off or anything, just set this aside and save them for later
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So next, I used a couple of pieces of wood, and the jack from the spare tire in the trunk to ghetto-rig a support for the engine block. This is simply used to help push the engine up and down, to wiggle the rear mount in and get it aligned. Don’t put much pressure on it yet, just get it in place and solidly on the oil pan.
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Like an idiot I forgot to take a picture of the rear mount before removing it, but it’s easy to find. Right next to the oil drain bolt. There are only two 19mm bolts to remove, first remove the one that goes through the mount and the subframe, then remove the one that goes through the mount and the oil pan. The oil pan bolt was a beotch to get out on my car, I ended up slipping a metal pipe over the end of my ratchet for better leverage to get it off. Here’s a pic of the empty rear mount after it was removed:
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Here’s a snazzy pic of the new Hasport rear torque mount next to the stock mount:
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So, getting the new rear mount in can be a beast. In fact, I was having a hard time getting it to slide in, so I checked on 8th to see if others were having similar issues, and it sounded like that was the case. I used my ghetto engine jack to move the engine up and away so that I could get the proper angle, but it turns out the Hasport mount itself was just a bit too thick top-to-bottom, to fit into the space on the frame. Here’s a pic of the mount not wanting to go all the way in:
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I ended up shaving it down a bit, the metal center piece on one side, and the rubber itself on the other side. Here’s a pic of the shaved metal piece… I didn’t take much off, but it absolutely wouldn’t go in if I didn’t shave it a hair.
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After shaving each side a bit, I put on a tiny touch of Vaseline, then with some elbow grease it slid in (that's what she said... giggity). Here’s a pic of it finally all the way into the frame:
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Hasport suggests putting the bolt through the oil pan in first, followed by the bolt through the subframe. I did it the other way, simple because it was so tough getting that bastage in there. You can see in the pic above, I’ve already got the subframe bolt in. I didn’t tighten it down, just put it in and threaded it a bit so that it would hold the mount where it needed to be, as I lowered the engine/oil pan onto the other end of the mount.

Lowering the engine so that the oil pan bolt holes lined up on the mount was a bit tricky. It wasn’t as simple as just lowering the engine jack, I had to reposition the engine jack (closer to the mount, as opposed to the front of the engine) and lift up a little bit. Then, I had to manually push it a bit while my girlfriend slid the bolt in while it was still lined up. You may have a different experience, but bottom line is to be prepared to get creative with maneuvering the engine so that the oil pan bolt holes line up with the rear mount. Here’s a pic of the rear mount with both bolts in.
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At this point, you are done with the rear mount (for now). Don’t tighten the bolts down yet. You can also replace the nut and bolt on the front mount, but again don’t tighten it down.


Now you will begin working on the left-hand side mount. If you didn’t clean out the engine bay (remove intake, battery, and ECU) before you started, now is the time to do it.

Go ahead and put the supplied bolt, washers, and nut to connect the mount and bracket. You’ll put it in as a single piece later. Here’s a pic of the assembled left-hand mount/bracket:
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You can also remove the ghetto engine jack, and slide it over underneath the tranny and do the same… support from underneath. You don’t need to literally “raise” it, just give it some solid pressure so it doesn’t drop. Here’s my ghetto tranny support:
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Alright, so the good news is that you do almost all of this mount from the top. To start, remove the two 10mm bolts shown below. Save one of the bolts for reuse later.
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Next, remove the two 17mm nuts and one bolt that hold the mount to the transmission, shown below. Note that the Hasport instructions say that these are 12mm, but it must be a typo… they are 17mm on my car anyways. Had me doubting myself for a second, but there are the ones to remove.
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Here is the mount with those bolts removed (I ended up taking that black thing off, which doesn’t need to be done, just the three bolts circled in the picture above):
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Next, you’ll remove the three 17mm bolts that hold the mount to the frame.
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Start with the lower bolt. It’s tough to get to, and the Hasport instructions say to get to it from underneath. I disagree. For me, it was easier to remove the battery tray and give yourself some wrench room. You can see the battery tray is gone in this picture:
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Use an oldschool wrench, ratcheting wrench is best if you have one. See here, with the battery tray removed, you can get to it right from the front. Movements are pretty limited (that’s why ratcheting wrench will help you not want to kill someone), but with a little patience it comes off easily.
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Next you can get the upper two bolts with a regular ratchet. The back bolt is close to some wire loom, but it can be pushed aside enough to get the ratchet on there. Push the ground wire down if you need to.
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Here’s the left-hand mount with all bolts removed, ready to be taken out.
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Taking the stock mount out is pretty easy, just pulls right out. Gotta be a little careful with some of the hard lines in there, but again it was very simple just pulling it out.
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Here’s the stock left-hand mount after being removed, and a comparison of the new Hasport mount/bracket with the old stock.
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Putting the new mount in is equally simple, just slide it in as a single piece, making sure to sit it on the tranny bolts even. Watch out for that hard line like when taking the stock mount out.
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Before putting any bolts or nuts back on, grab one of the threaded flange washers provided with the Hasport kit. This guy right here:
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And put that bad boy on the front tranny bolt, as shown here:
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Now, attach the ground wire and clutch line to the threaded flange washer. Sandwich the ground wire between the flange washer and the clutch line so that it gets a good ground connection.
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Go ahead and put the two nuts and one bolt (original ones used with the stock mount) that connect the mount to the transmission back in. Don’t tighten them all the way down.
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Next you’ll connect the mount/bracket to the frame. This time, use the two M12x35mm bolts and washers provided with the Hasport kit for the upper bolts, do not reuse the stock ones. These take a 19mm socket (as opposed to the 17mm socket for the stock bolts). I had to swing the engine/tranny a bit to get the holes to line up, but it wasn’t hard (they weren’t far off). Don’t tighten down, just get them in and leave a little loose.
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Now, the last bolt is the lower bolt for the frame, this one you will reuse the stock bolt. The hardest part of this is getting the dam bolt in there to begin with… I ended up starting it off from underneath the car, from behind the driver’s side wheel. There is enough room to snake your arm up there. Of course, getting the bolt horizontal and pressing it in while turning it, with almost no room, isn’t easy. But it can be done. Don’t try and screw it all the way down, just catch a couple of threads then go back in from the top. This was the best way I could figure to get this bolt started. Here is a pic from underneath and behind the driver side wheel:
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Once again you’ll want to murder a small child while trying to screw it down, using a wrench from the front with a tiny amount of rotational room. Again if you’ve got a ratcheting wrench, you’ll get it done much quicker than me. Just work at it from the front, and eventually it will get all the way in. It’s easy, just tedious.
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After installing the left and rear mounts, this is the only stock hardware you should have left that you don’t need:
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Alrighty, so take a break if you wish, you’ve come far but still have far to go. The right-side mount just might rock your [email protected] and @ss, so be prepared. This is where you will be working, begin by taking out the two 10mm bolts holding the AC line to the brackets on either end (one not shown in picture):
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For this mount you will need yet again the engine support from below. Here is my ghetto rig, that ended up getting the job done. It should be noted, that later on you may/will need to reposition the board underneath to wiggle the engine this way and that.
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To start, you’ll remove the torque rod, a.k.a. dogbone. Just remove the three 17mm bolts shown here:
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Once you have it unbolted, it just slides forward and out, mine came out without any problem. You can discard the dogbone and the bolts, you won’t need any of them.
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Next, you’ll be removing the ground cable and aluminum bracket that connects the stock mount to the engine. You must remove the bolts (and nut) shown here (17mm and 19mm, plus a 10mm bolt for the ground cable)
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To get the nut off of the tall bolt, you’ll need a super-deep socket. I didn’t see any way to get a wrench on it, so it was off to the hardware store to pick up a really deep socket. It’s easy to get off once you’ve got the right tools. I did have to put a piece of pipe over the end of my ratchet to remove that nut, it was on pretty darn tight.
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The rest of them come off pretty easy. Once you’ve removed all of the bolts and nut shown above, you can remove the aluminum bracket. I had to use my engine brace underneath to push up on the engine in order for the bracket to loosen up so that I could pull it off. Here’s all the parts after you’ve taken them off. You’ll need to save most of the bolts/nut, so don’t lose them (you can toss the one with the X, you won’t need it).
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Once you’ve gotten that bracket removed, the next thing is to remove the side brace that connects the mount to the side of the engine bay. You’ll have to remove three 14mm bolts, plus a 10mm (I think) bolt which is not shown in the picture (there’s an arrow pointing to it, it holds some hard lines and can be reached from the rear).
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The 14mm bolt into the side wall and the 10mm bolts are straight-forward to remove. The other two bolts which are side by side, can be gotten easily if you pop the tab holding the washer fluid thingie and move it aside, you can then come straight down from the top. Once again, hang on to all of these bolts and the brace itself, you’ll reuse them later.
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Here’s the side brace with all of the bolts removed
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From there it’s easy to pull out, just pull it out from the left (closest to the side wall of the bay, not towards the engine).
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Alright, you’re almost done removing the stock stuff, last thing to take out is the stock mount itself. There are two 17mm bolts pretty far down, here it is viewed from the top.
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To get to them, I ended up using a ratchet with three extensions, then finally the 17mm socket LOL. Worked really well actually. Save these bolts for reuse later.
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Once those two bolts are removed, you can pull the stock mount right out. You’ll have to snake it a bit, I can’t really get a picture, just play with it and it will come out.
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Now the fun begins. Time to put the Hasport stuff in, and pray that it all goes together well.

First, put the Hasport bracket in. Similar to taking the stock mount out, you’ll have to kind of snake it in there, if you’re good at Tetris then this should be easy. If not, just keep trying different things until you get it in. It WILL go in, I promise. Here is the Hasport bracket after I got it set in:
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You can put the two bolts used on the stock mount in to attach the Hasport bracket to the frame rail, use your mega extension ratchet or however else you did it, but don’t tighten the bolts down, just get them threaded in a bit. Next you’ll put the side brace on, start with the upper bolt into the side wall of the engine bay. Don’t tighten that bolt down yet either. You can also attach the 10mm bolt on the back holding the hard lines.
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The other two bolts which attach the side brace to the Hasport bracket are a little tougher, because you have to use some Hasport-provided nuts/washers underneath to hold the stock bolts. These are the bolt-holes and Hasport hardware I’m talking about:
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With your right hand, take one nut and washer, then hold it from underneath (putting your hand in through the spot where the Hasport mount will go later). This is the proper way to cup the nuts (giggity) so that you can put the bolts in:
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Just get a couple of threads in while holding with your hand, and get both bolts started. These two bolts, you will go ahead and tighten down fully. In order to do so, you’ll need a way to hold the nuts underneath while putting a ratchet on the bolts. I put a wrench on the bolts, and let the engine itself brace the wrench while I tighted the bolt down via a ratchet:
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Now, the moment of truth. Prepare yourself for a little frustration, and have faith that it can work/fit. You will be placing the Hasport mount onto the tall bolt and into the bracket. I don’t have many pictures, not much to photograph. But I will tell you, it took several repositionings of the engine support underneath, raising it up and down, as well as a few hammer strokes on the mount itself, to get it to sit in flush and the holes line up between the bracket and mount so that you can put the bolt through. It’s not too hard to get the bracket/mount holes to line up, but it was tough getting the Hasport mount to be aligned with the bracket, fit over the tall bolt, and sit flush over the tall bolt. Here is the mount after I finally got it aligned and set in flush:
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Good news: the hardest part, by far, is over. You’ve got a few more things to put on, then tighten everything down if things are aligned, but none of it is too tough.

Grab the Hasport brace which replaces the stock dogbone, and go ahead and rest it in place as shown here:
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Use the Hasport-provided hardware to bolt that brace in place, don’t tighten it down quite yet.
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Remember the ground cable? Now it’s time to re-attach that. Grab the other threaded flange washer, this guy right here:
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And put it on the tall bolt, like this:
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Go ahead and use the stock nut and bolt, to secure the Hasport mount to the engine (don’t tighten down). This is where you bolt the ground wire to the threaded flange washer.
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Don’t forget to re-attach the AC line bolts. And you’re done! Pretty much. Give yourself a pat on the back, drink a beer, smoke a cigar or cigarette or whatever else. This is the left-over hardware from the right-hand side that you should have remaining, anything else and I think you forgot to put something in 
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Now, you’ll want to check the alignment of your mounts. My left mount and right mounts looked like they were money without any adjustment.
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My rear mount actually doesn’t look like it is lined up properly, but I'm not sure. It’s not bad, but seems a little off to me. Since the left and right were OK, I don’t want to mess with it too much, so I’ll ride with it as-is for a bit, then re-check for rubber damage or wear after a bit.
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Once you are happy with the alignment, go ahead and tighten all of your mounts down. Hasport suggests the following order: (1) right, (2) left, (3) rear, (4) front.

And that's it, start putting the pieces of the bay back together (ECU, battery, intake). You can reinstall the ECU bracket, using the remaining bolt hole on the new Hasport mount:
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And here is the ECU itself reinstalled, along with the battery tray.
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Finally, the fully re-assembled engine bay. Now go enjoy your new mounts!
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I hope this helps someone out! Let me know if you’ve got any questions or recommendations, so we can all learn a better way to do it.
You did a great job on this!
Specially for your first DIY post, whats next?
 

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For those of you that had to shave some down on the 70A. Did you have to shave the black Urethane? I shaved the aluminum or whatever on the part that goes to the oil pan bracket. I cant not get the end into the subframe period. I have tried everything I can think of, other then to shave down the black Urethane.
 

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For those of you that had to shave some down on the 70A. Did you have to shave the black Urethane? I shaved the aluminum or whatever on the part that goes to the oil pan bracket. I cant not get the end into the subframe period. I have tried everything I can think of, other then to shave down the black Urethane.
I didnt shave it at all, did u grease it? It's all in playing around with the floor jack & prying the engine back & forth.
 
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