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After reading this, I'll stick to blank rotors with better pads. It's better suited for my driving habits. Thanks for this info.
 

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Added the slotted and drilled rotors, just for looks. Makes the kids wonder what else that old man has going on.
 

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This is great, thanks for the detailed info! I've always wondered what the purpose of slotted or crossdrilled rotors are for.:woowoo:
 

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Does anyone know how much shorter the life of the pads will be with slotted?? For example roughly how many miles does a regal pad on blanks last vs. slotted. I want to get slotted rotors. Thanks for this article.
 

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Most guys who track their cars will run cheap blanks since they are wear items and less likely to crack. They give you more thermal capacity.

Talk to reputable BBK manufacturers and they will at the most suggest slotted rotors, not drilled.
 

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i just finish reading synopsis of 2006 SAE's (Society of Automotive Engineers) technical book "The Effect of Rotor Crossdrilling on Brake Performance"

link: http://www.tazcobra.com/SAE_2006010691_Synopsis.pdf

it does not tells me if the drilled rotors are prone to crack vs blank rotors, but it did confirmed x drilled rotors are functional, x drilled rotors are not cosmetics. so sae's engineeer's are wrong then ?
 

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i just finish reading synopsis of 2006 SAE's (Society of Automotive Engineers) technical book "The Effect of Rotor Crossdrilling on Brake Performance"

link: http://www.tazcobra.com/SAE_2006010691_Synopsis.pdf

it does not tells me if the drilled rotors are prone to crack vs blank rotors, but it did confirmed x drilled rotors are functional, x drilled rotors are not cosmetics. so sae's engineeer's are wrong then ?
Not trying to argue with you on this but....the main point of the OP posting this thread is to steer people away from spending excess money on a braking system for minimal gains if at all. I think it's been proven time and time again that good pads, and also, good rubber, will yield you much more noticeable braking results as opposed to overall rotor / pad size. BBKs do handle heat dissipation better as the increased surface area naturally would. But truly it's all about the pad material and how good your tires are, period.

I read your article, and I am not disputing the findings of these engineers one bit. How could I? They performed their tests, are obviously very knowledgeable in their field, and did indeed find certain small benefits to crossdrilled rotors.

Yes, cooling capacity was increased even though the surface area was reduced due to increased airflow through the vent area and lower air resistance by being drilled , but the overall increase in dissipation was 10-20% keeping note of the fact that 2 different braking systems were being utilized, with the more performance-oriented system only yielding dissipation results of 10% better while the more street-oriented test yielded 20% better dissipation at increasing speeds. But why is that necessary? Why would you need any kind of heat dissipation when it comes to performance of street braking? Keep in mind that the 20% efficiency increase occurred at 99 mph, why would this be necessary for a street car on street pads? It's not.

As far as performance was concerned they never did reveal how much better the crossdrilled vs blanks were concerned in terms of braking output under various temps. They did say that there was obviously glazing on the blanks while the drilled had none, an obvious conclusion, but they noted that the glazing would actually reinforce the rotor, whereas the drilled version was obviously weaker by design, so the entire tradeoff would become negligible.


And finally the wet performance. They found that the blanks naturally fared better under 200C and the drilled did better above it, but only marginally. And at 400C the blanks actually did better than the drilled by a little. Again, a negligible result that basically winds up a moot for both.




The moral of this story? While crossdrilling might provide an edge under certain conditions the blanks also have their strongpoints in certain conditions, and basically the trade-offs are negligible all the way around. So yes, you gain MINIMAL gains at the expense of greater pad wear and less durability. Not something you'd want for a street car (which most of our civics basically are), especially at the higher cost for drilled vs blanks, but in the same regard it appears that many racing teams appreciate the benefit of pad longevity as well as rotor durability by using blanks. I believe an experienced racing driver would much rather prefer his pads last longer and his rotors don't grenade vs marginally better performance which can be negated by increased driver skill.
 

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stop tech's x drilled rotors are cheaper than blanks & slots...

and if the test results are correct, even 10% temp reduction is a big deal in so cal, during summer time, just few hour of local drive will cause brake fluid reach boiling point.

i'm not sure how hot the rotors are.. but if i can reduce 500f down to 450f for everyday driving, i think it's good upgrade.

here is another test conduct by DOT, about brake system temperature.

http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/research/reports/fullreports/434.1.pdf
 

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stop tech's x drilled rotors are cheaper than blanks & slots...

and if the test results are correct, even 10% temp reduction is a big deal in so cal, during summer time, just few hour of local drive will cause brake fluid reach boiling point.

i'm not sure how hot the rotors are.. but if i can reduce 500f down to 450f for everyday driving, i think it's good upgrade.

here is another test conduct by DOT, about brake system temperature.

http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/research/reports/fullreports/434.1.pdf
I live in socal as well and you should NOT be boiling fluid from DD'ing. I would say there is something wrong with your brake system. The only time me or any of my canyon buddies have ever managed to straight boil brake fluid was from doing runs for nearly an hour straight at nearly the capacity of the car, this was also on dot 3 when we we're newer to the canyon scene. Now we all run racing dot 4 or 5.1, never boiled fluid since. Brake fade? Yeah, definitely... after 15 minutes on cheap pads that'll happen but we're all running better pads and blanks now and we haven't boiled and there will only be fade when we're really pushing it. For DD'ing I've never heard of or experienced anything near brake fade, hell even Napa ceramics won't get to the proper "ideal grip" temperature from normal driving.
 

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my dd is different than your dd...

i drive about 30 miles a day (11-5), all local within SGV. my brake start fading around 4pm & i do alot of stop & go, i would say include lunch, i visit 8~10 places a day.
 

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Then perhaps your running cheap brake parts alongside some dot3. All I can say is if I can do 30 miles in the canyons without fade (or you're even saying boiling which is even more rare), 30 miles of stop and go shouldn't cause fade.
 
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