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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok here's the deal. I have done complete installs in quite a few cars...but all of them were older than me. I wasn't as concerned about hacking up the wiring as I am with my Civic. I was wondering if I ran a power wire and tapped the remote wire off of it with a switch(to simulate the on and off of the radio) would that work? OR do I have to hack the remote turn on off the amplifier? I know I could use a T-splice, but I would love to just run that one wire for it. I know that the remote is just a power wire basically that says when to turn the amp on and off when the radio is on and off. I just want to throw 2 subs in the trunk for a little more hit. I have an amp leftover from one of my previous cars, and figured why not use it. I plan to get a LOC to tap off the current sub wiring for the RCA's. Any input would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok I'll pass on tapping the remote from the power wire. Now I have a second question. I have an EX coupe and am wondering the best place to go through for the power wire. I have read that some Civics have a hole right above the accelerator, and I am not sure if that is Sedan/Coupe/EX/LX/Si, etc. I tried looking from the engine and the air box is in the way. Any help?
 

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Ok these two pictures are REALLY REALLY BAD (RAZR FTL) and it's dark out. I won't be home for three weeks so no good pictures until then but this should give and idea of where the hole is. From the interior, it's basically inline with the center console above the accelerator. There's already a wire in the hole but my 4AWG fit fine. 1/0 won't fit without cutting the hole bigger.



 

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Are you saying you want to simulate a remote wire without actually connecting the remote wire to a proper power source? I'm pretty sure the remote wire should be 5 volts... IIRC. So the power wire wuold be too much for the remote wire to handle.
 

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Remote wire is +12V, usually .5~.75A

Back when I installed for a paycheck, several (ghetto might I add) cars would come through with this exact thing going on. They would jump the power over to the remote and just switch it on before they started their car. I would always fix it, but it always worked for them.

(don't quote me on this) I seriously don't think the current would matter, because even though the power wire has alot of current going through it, the remote wire would only be pulling .5 amps of said current.

That's like saying if you have a hi-output alternator, your entire electrical system would be seeing that high current.

:popcorn:
 

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Different brand of 1/0 wire will be different sized and the shielding will vary in thickness.
You can probably buy a crappy brand wire thats not a true 1/0.
Duh. But overall, MOST 1/0 is the same OVERALL diameter, granted jackets and actual wire sizes are different. The 1/0 I was using was technically more like 2awg BUT it was the SAME diameter as Hyperflex 1/0.
 

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Duh. But overall, MOST 1/0 is the same OVERALL diameter, granted jackets and actual wire sizes are different. The 1/0 I was using was technically more like 2awg BUT it was the SAME diameter as Hyperflex 1/0.
Why the "Duh."?

You proved my point with the whole "MOST" thing...

What background do you have?
MECP certified perhaps? =|
 

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lol no I'm not MECP certified, just a hobby.

But all in all, the Hyperflex is amazing. Cheap wire FTL (couldn't bend enough for the K20 Big 3).

I said MOST because Knu's Kol is enormous for 1/0 compared to say Stinger 1/0, as an example of why most was used there.
 

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NO.
When ever you run a power wire in a car the wire must be capable of handling the current capacity of the fuse for the circuit you are tapping. In other words, if you tap a circuit, say your amp power line that is fused for 60 amps then the wire you use must be able to safely handle 60 amps. If you connect an 18 ga amp turn on wire to your amp power lead and the wire gets shorted to ground it will burst in to flames. If your amps turn on circuit malfunctions and shorts, the wire or amp can go up in flames. Any of these conditions can torch your car including running the amp power lead through the firewall without a proper grommet. The grommet protects the wire from chaffing from the normal vibrations of driving and helps to prevent catastrophic shorts in the event of a collision.

You should tap a switched accessory circuit; if you don’t know how to do this take it to someone that does.

Amp ratings for wire size can be found on the internet.

jeff
 

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this whole thing makes no sense. why would you tap it to the constant and then put a switch on it. you're defeating the whole purpose of the remote wire. tap it into a fuse that comes on when the key is on. like your wipers.
 

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This talk of "current" doesn't apply in this case. There is only 1 real power source in the car, and that is "the battery", or the alternator when the car is running. 12 volts.. and the "Current" drawn is determined by the amount of 'load' presented across that 12 volt source and the negative (Car chassis)

If you're asking "can you jump from the thick power wire to the amp,(that you ran to the battery, fused) through a switch, then to the "remote turn on " input on your amp.. the answer is yes. Current is something that is drawn (sucked up as a result of an electrical load) and has no bearing on the 12 volts that that thick wire will carry.

clearly you've already run a fused 12v monster wire to the battery. That's cool.

battery----+----------------amp 12v in
L______switch_____amp remote turn-on.



sure.. why the heck not! .. sounds like one of those theoretical questions..

BUT.. after re-reading your question:

"I plan to get a LOC to tap off the current sub wiring for the RCA's. Any input would be appreciated."

I think what you're asking is how best to trigger the amp when there's no 'remote turn on" wire from your factory deck. YES you can use a switch and in-turn run it to an accessory fuse. and YES you can, in theory, connect to a switch and then directly to the battery wire.. but you risk leaving the amp turned on and killing your battery. SO.. best would be to connect to an accessory fuse. The current draw on a remote trigger wire is usually next to nothing, since it's a transistorized input on a modern amp... your existing car fuses can surely accommodate this new circuit.

hope this helps.


J.
 

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Oh yeah.. I see this is old, but

Peripheral Electronics Has a LOC that has a built in remote output for your application. You just need to run a constant +12v to it.


But I see another problem. If you use that LOC on your current low-level sub wiring, the signal created by that LOC may not be that great. A LOC is designed to create a low-level signal from a high-level source(speaker wires) and convert it to a low-level(rca) output.
Creating a low-level output from a low-level input may not turn out as great as it could be.
 

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This talk of "current" doesn't apply in this case. There is only 1 real power source in the car, and that is "the battery", or the alternator when the car is running. 12 volts.. and the "Current" drawn is determined by the amount of 'load' presented across that 12 volt source and the negative (Car chassis)

If you're asking "can you jump from the thick power wire to the amp,(that you ran to the battery, fused) through a switch, then to the "remote turn on " input on your amp.. the answer is yes. Current is something that is drawn (sucked up as a result of an electrical load) and has no bearing on the 12 volts that that thick wire will carry.

clearly you've already run a fused 12v monster wire to the battery. That's cool.

battery----+----------------amp 12v in
L______switch_____amp remote turn-on.



sure.. why the heck not! .. sounds like one of those theoretical questions..


J.
Fuses are used to protect the wiring from melting in the event of a short circuit. Every wire gauge has a maximum safe current carrying capability. The wire is sized for the load and the fuse is sized for the wire. If you run an 18ga wire off your amp power terminal to a switch and then to the remote turn on, the wire will only have to carry about ½ amp. Easy for the 18ga, but, if the wire gets pinched or frays and shorts to ground then the poor 18ga has to take whatever current the 60amp (or larger) fuse allows before it blows. In this condition, the 18ga will melt and this is dangerous. This is why each circuit in your car has a fuse and you have different ga wires.

If you attach a wire to a circuit and the circuit uses a larger gauge (thicker) wire then the one you are connecting then the new wire must be fussed at the connection. This is standard electrical engineering practice and it is how to prevent things from catching fire if a problem arises.

You can check the12volt.com for a list of fuse vs wire size.

Besides, like others have posted already, just tap a switched circuit, you can buy a piggy back fuse to do this.

jeff
 
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