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Hi guys,

I've had these tires for almost 10 years, drive them 6 months a year on average let's say (6 months for the all season tires and 6 months for winter), in total I drove 28000 km (combined winter and all season). The grooves on the tire are almost brand new and I last had them checked by honda during another recall from last year, but recently a mechanic I went to in order to inspect another problem said I had fissures on my tires and they should be thrown away asap and it would be dangerous to drive with them.

Now I don't trust mechanic shops these guys once tried charging me 80$ to replace a brake light. I attached a picture of the tire and the fissures are visible, but are they really a concern ? How long do you think I should wait before changing them ?

Thanks in advance
 

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i heard there is a time limit to tires life. even if you never drive on them. there is metal inside. the belts are metal. and there can be corrosion even if you can't see it. it's not just the mileage...what I heard.
 

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The cold, rain and the heat tend to make the tyre rubber brittle over a period of time and fissures or cracks appear. Moreover once the rubber hardens, the road grip decreases and the braking distances increase.

So not just the mileage but the time duration also matters.

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I see, so I guess I should replace all my tires then ? Is there any money to be made from them like selling to a recycling company or should I just throw them out ?
 

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Some tyre dealers buy back tyres that are in good condition. But 10 years may be too long a time for that. Anyway you can try your luck.

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Tires definitely have a usable life, regardless of the treadwear. Those lines and cracks are symptoms and signs of dry rot, which happens to all tires. The lack of use accelerates the breakdown of the tire. There is much reputable info on the web regarding tire condition over time. Yours is a classic example of keeping them too long. Cars that aren't driven often break down. So do their tires.

FYI For All: Tire shine products which contain petroleum distillates cause premature failure of tires. The excerpt below was taken from tirebuyer.com and indicates it was taken from the folks at Michelin.

"Avoid the use of petroleum based tire cleaning products as they can exhaust the tire's oxidation and weathering agents within the rubber compounds, resulting in cracking. Use only non-petroleum based products or plain soap and water for tire cleaning.”

The jpg below is taken from the Michelin Tire Warranty Book, which can be found online at Michelin Replacement Owners Manual

241568
 

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I would rather replace the tire with that condition. Better safe than sorry. Just think of your love ones waiting for you to go back home in one piece.
 

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Once a tire heat cycles/gets warmed up once they are usually only good for about 6 years even if they were never used after that. That is why I never buy old tires that are sitting on a rack. The tread literally separates from the rest of the tire. Aside from dry rot And tire wear. That is why they have a dot year to track the life.

 

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I've heard six year old tires are okay but ten years is too much. I've also heard small cracks in the rubber is okay but not cracks of a certain size. I'd also be more concerned with cracks on the delicate sidewall than between the tread. The mechanic is right, replace the tires.

If you don't drive much, consider getting winter tires that can be used in the summer. E.g. Toyo Celcius. It can save you money rather than buying two sets of tires.
 
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