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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I didn't see anything on this with a quick search so I figured I would snap a few shots while I was working for any of you that are not sure on what to do. Hopefully I can help someone out:smile:

Okay so here we have it, your drum brake. This is my dad's 2006 DX-G sedan

I would start of by spraying some penetrating oil around the hub and studs, wd40 works well for this. Now see if you can pull the drum off, if your lucky it will just slide off. If your not so lucky like I was your going to want to use a pry bar and a mallet and "persuade" that drum off:pray: Heat also helps, I had to use a poor mans Acetylene torch and settle for propane.

Once you have your drum off this is what you will see


Now I would use a can of brake cleaner and spray down the whole thing down, I wouldn't recommend using air to blow it off as brake dust isn't exactly the best thing to be breathing in.

Here we have the freshly cleaned parts:thumb:


Now onto the adjusting

In the red cycle we have whats called the star wheel and you turn that to adjust your drums. You can get the proper tool for a few dollars to turn it or just a regular flat head screw driver works just fine. You turn the star wheel in a downwards direction and you will here it clicking against the metal part that touches against the teeth. Turn it a little bit at a time and test fit the drum to see how much drag you have. I was taught to set it to turn about half a revolution before coming to a stop after spinning it with some force. If you set it to tight and need to back it off simply use a finger and pull back the little arm that is touching the teeth and turn the wheel in the other direction.

Now that you have it all properly adjusted it is time to use the anti-seize and make the job of getting the drums off a whole lot easier next time:dance:


You should also put some where the wheel cylinder touches the shoes and also on the bottom end of the shoes, basically all the contact points.

Now you are done, just put your wheels back on and don't forget to check your nuts afterward s for proper torquing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I guess nobody has drums, oh well. At least my dad gave me money for putting the front rotors/pads on and adjusting the rears:dance:
 

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+1!!!

Mine started to rust awhile ago, but not as bad as your dad's. But gotta get it checked out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
by the time i was done beating on it to get the drivers side off the rust fell off anyways. He rocks the steelies on his so i don't think he cares, after 115,000km(71,000miles) there's still plenty of shoe left.
 

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Wegue Wegue
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Awesome DIY, Loads of people have drums, just so many threads to go through, things don't always get found.

Nice write up. I've gotta do mine once the snow is gone.

My '06 drums aren't that corroded. That's pretty messed up.
It's time for me to do mine.. weehee...

So I need , penetrating oil (wd40) , brake cleaner... and... muscle with a screw driver... :beer:
 

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Nice write up and Pics. Thanks for taking the time to do this. Two notes...

In the first picture you can see 2 small holes in the drum between the lugs next to 2 of the studs. Those are typically threaded and they're used to pop the drum off if it's slightly stuck. Find the correct threaded bolts and screw them in finger tight. You can then tighten them down one after the other back and forth until the drum pops off. I'd also tap the drum with a hammer (be careful not to beat on it and bend it... use a metal rod to get to the area right around the hub) to help jar it loose if needed. And as you say, some penetrating oil around the hub is good.

As far as the anti-seize, that's a good thought but I haven't seen it done. I'd be careful how much to use and maybe keep it right at the hub. At 70mph, the rotational force may work all that grease out to the drum surface on the inside. If that happens, your shoes are toast. I'm not 100% sure but just a concern.
 

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Decent DIY, but you forgot to mention one thing. Since you've cleaned out the drums, you've removed to grease on the backing plate where the shoes' metal skeleton and the plate meet. After many miles/years this grease disappears, so that would have been a good time to recondition it. There are three spots/tabs each, near the top, at the center (where the anchor pin holds the shoe down) and on the bottom of each shoe where it sits on the metal backing plate (referred to as the shoe land or bosses). The easiest way to do this is to unlatch the anchor pin, swivel each shoe towards the center(where the hub is), take a small grease brush with a LITTLE bit of silicone lube and lube each spot. Focus on the little bit, too much can get onto the shoes' organic material and contaminate it. Re install the anchor and drum. This will ensure the shoes are operating smoothly and the backing plate won't develop a groove or rust out over the years. I'd take a picture, but I have disc brakes sorry.

Here, I found a website that has pictures and explains it. -http://www.checkthatcar.com/change%20drum%20brakes.asp
 

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Worked for me

Thanks for this post. Nice to see exactly what I was going to find. The bolts you use are M8 1.25 in metric or 5/16 in inches. Those bolts can be used to remove the drum to access the star wheel. Adjustment made a big difference in my brake pedal and in tension when pulling the ebrake.
 

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Im doin rears everything is put back right priblem is the top spring is way to loose and if i tighten the adjuster i cant put drum on so i left it loose put drum on in back of metal plate is a slot u stick your flat head thru to try and tighten the adjusterwith the drum on...i never had this problem doin drums.
 
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