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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so its my firster time with my si in this cold weather. I start my car and let it idle till it begins to drop in rpm's. I start driving being careful not to shift over 3k rpm's until care is warmed up. It seems to take forever for this car to get to temp when driving. I drive for a good 8-10 mins before its at 4 bars! I am pondering if I should put my factory air box back on inplace of the SRI I have. Will this help my car warm up faster?
 

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probably not, we just have a high compression motor that takes a long time to warm up and doesnt drive too well until it does!
 

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I usually wait for the RPMs to drop down until i drive. First few mins of driving I keep it low but once I get into about 3rd or 4th gear the boggyness isn't really there to much.. just take it up to around 5k and shift in those gears.. it will warm up. I have a CAI btw
 

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i live in florida and it just got to the 50/60s. my car does take a bit longer to warm up but not that much compared to when it's the usual 85+ degress outside.

i usually just wait in my driveway until i see all 9 bars (fully warmed up) on the temp. gauge. takes about 5 to 7 min.
 

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i live in florida and it just got to the 50/60s. my car does take a bit longer to warm up but not that much compared to when it's the usual 85+ degress outside.

i usually just wait in my driveway until i see all 9 bars (fully warmed up) on the temp. gauge. takes about 5 to 7 min.
I don't think Id be that worried with these types of temperatures. Us snow belters are now dealing with sub 30º mornings.

I let my civic just idle for about 4 minutes, then drive slowly to start and its good to go shortly after that
 

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I am from Minnesota and have to deal with cold temperatures a lot. I would say that when the temperature gets below 40 degrees, I would let it idle a little to let a couple of bars pop up.

I am of the school that says you should begin to drive your car without excessive idling. Excessive idling is not good for a motor. I begin to drive away slowly and shift at low rpms. I drive the car gingerly until the motor is up to operating temp.

I found this article about excessive warmup or idling:

Idling gets you nowhere - and it can be costly. Excessive idling wastes an enormous amount of fuel and money and generates needless greenhouse gas emissions.

In winter conditions, emissions from idling vehicle are more than double the normal level immediately after a cold start.

Warming up the engine means more than the engine. The tires, transmission, wheel bearings and other moving parts also need to warm for the vehicle to perform well. Most of these parts do not warm until the vehicle is driven.

Once a vehicle is running, the best way to warm it up is drive it. With computer controlled, fuel-injected engines, you need no more than 30 seconds of idling on winter days before driving away.

The catalytic converter - the device that cleans pollutants from the vehicle exhaust - does not function at its peak until it reached between 750 and 1500 degrees Fahrenheit. The best way to warm the converter is to drive the vehicle.

Idling emits more pollution if the catalytic converter is not working properly. Ask your technician to check the system the next time your car is being serviced.

Driving a vehicle cuts warm-up times in half. This reduces fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

Ten seconds of idling can use more fuel than turning off the engine and restarting it. If you are stopped for more than 10 seconds - except in traffic - turn off your engine.

Every 10 minutes of idling costs you at least 2/10 (0.2) of a gallon of gas - and up about 7/10 (0.7) of a gallon for an 8-cylinder engine. Keep in mind that every gallon of gas you use you produce about 19 pounds of carbon dioxide.

Excessive idling can be hard on your engine. Because an engine is not working at its peak operating temperature, fuel does not undergo complete combustion. This leaves fuel residue that contaminates engine oil and makes spark plugs dirty.

Restarting a car many times has little impact on engine components such as the battery and the starter motor. The wear on parts that restarting the engine causes adds about $10 a year to the cost of driving - money that you'll likely recover several times over in fuel savings.

It‘s important to drive away as soon as possible after a cold start. But avoid high speeds and rapid acceleration for the first 3-5 miles. This lets the whole vehicle reach peak operating temperature as quickly as possible without paying a fuel penalty.

If your vehicle has a diesel engine, idling actually lowers the coolant temperature faster than shutting off the engine. In other words, switching off the engine keeps the engine warm longer

A poorly tuned engine uses up to 15 percent more energy when idling than a well-tuned vehicle. Keeping your vehicle in good condition is a key to fuel efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Idling your vehicle with the air conditioner on (to keep the interior cool) can increase emissions by 13 percent.

Warming up a vehicle is the most common reason given for idling - in both winter and summer! Many drivers also say that they often idle while sitting in the drive-through lane of a fast-food restaurant or while waiting for someone.

Thank you to the Office of Energy Efficiency of Natural

Resources Canada for this information.
 
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I don't think Id be that worried with these types of temperatures. Us snow belters are now dealing with sub 30º mornings.

I let my civic just idle for about 4 minutes, then drive slowly to start and its good to go shortly after that
damn. honestly ive never felt that cold of weather. actually, i've NEVER seen snow before haha. so you "snow belters" would prolly be wearing shorts and sandals in florida weather huh?
 

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I am from Minnesota and have to deal with cold temperatures a lot. I would say that when the temperature gets below 40 degrees, I would let it idle a little to let a couple of bars pop up.

I am of the school that says you should begin to drive your car without excessive idling. Excessive idling is not good for a motor. I begin to drive away slowly and shift at low rpms. I drive the car gingerly until the motor is up to operating temp.

I found this article about excessive warmup or idling:

Idling gets you nowhere - and it can be costly. Excessive idling wastes an enormous amount of fuel and money and generates needless greenhouse gas emissions.

In winter conditions, emissions from idling vehicle are more than double the normal level immediately after a cold start.

Warming up the engine means more than the engine. The tires, transmission, wheel bearings and other moving parts also need to warm for the vehicle to perform well. Most of these parts do not warm until the vehicle is driven.

Once a vehicle is running, the best way to warm it up is drive it. With computer controlled, fuel-injected engines, you need no more than 30 seconds of idling on winter days before driving away.

The catalytic converter - the device that cleans pollutants from the vehicle exhaust - does not function at its peak until it reached between 750 and 1500 degrees Fahrenheit. The best way to warm the converter is to drive the vehicle.

Idling emits more pollution if the catalytic converter is not working properly. Ask your technician to check the system the next time your car is being serviced.

Driving a vehicle cuts warm-up times in half. This reduces fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

Ten seconds of idling can use more fuel than turning off the engine and restarting it. If you are stopped for more than 10 seconds - except in traffic - turn off your engine.

Every 10 minutes of idling costs you at least 2/10 (0.2) of a gallon of gas - and up about 7/10 (0.7) of a gallon for an 8-cylinder engine. Keep in mind that every gallon of gas you use you produce about 19 pounds of carbon dioxide.

Excessive idling can be hard on your engine. Because an engine is not working at its peak operating temperature, fuel does not undergo complete combustion. This leaves fuel residue that contaminates engine oil and makes spark plugs dirty.

Restarting a car many times has little impact on engine components such as the battery and the starter motor. The wear on parts that restarting the engine causes adds about $10 a year to the cost of driving - money that you'll likely recover several times over in fuel savings.

It‘s important to drive away as soon as possible after a cold start. But avoid high speeds and rapid acceleration for the first 3-5 miles. This lets the whole vehicle reach peak operating temperature as quickly as possible without paying a fuel penalty.

If your vehicle has a diesel engine, idling actually lowers the coolant temperature faster than shutting off the engine. In other words, switching off the engine keeps the engine warm longer

A poorly tuned engine uses up to 15 percent more energy when idling than a well-tuned vehicle. Keeping your vehicle in good condition is a key to fuel efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Idling your vehicle with the air conditioner on (to keep the interior cool) can increase emissions by 13 percent.

Warming up a vehicle is the most common reason given for idling - in both winter and summer! Many drivers also say that they often idle while sitting in the drive-through lane of a fast-food restaurant or while waiting for someone.

Thank you to the Office of Energy Efficiency of Natural

Resources Canada for this information.
good info!
 

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damn. honestly ive never felt that cold of weather. actually, i've NEVER seen snow before haha. so you "snow belters" would prolly be wearing shorts and sandals in florida weather huh?
exactly..i love the snow + cold.

When my cousins came to visit a couple years ago, it was their first time seeing the snow and they loved it. They were freezing their butts off but they were out there playing in it all day
 

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exactly..i love the snow + cold.

When my cousins came to visit a couple years ago, it was their first time seeing the snow and they loved it. They were freezing their butts off but they were out there playing in it all day
i see your snow and raise you my beaches!:thumb:
 

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damn. honestly ive never felt that cold of weather. actually, i've NEVER seen snow before haha. so you "snow belters" would prolly be wearing shorts and sandals in florida weather huh?
yea man..i would definitely be wearing shorts in 50 degree weather...probably could break a sweat still lolz. yea in ohio during the winter at some points it gets below freezing..and..when it does its painful to be outside...like...u breath in through your nose and it burns bc the mucus and ur tissue in your nose feels like it froze...not cool..so...yea snows alot of fun tho...u should make a trip up some where up north and go skiing/snowboarding...its a huge rush..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I am from Minnesota and have to deal with cold temperatures a lot. I would say that when the temperature gets below 40 degrees, I would let it idle a little to let a couple of bars pop up.

I am of the school that says you should begin to drive your car without excessive idling. Excessive idling is not good for a motor. I begin to drive away slowly and shift at low rpms. I drive the car gingerly until the motor is up to operating temp.

I found this article about excessive warmup or idling:

Idling gets you nowhere - and it can be costly. Excessive idling wastes an enormous amount of fuel and money and generates needless greenhouse gas emissions.

In winter conditions, emissions from idling vehicle are more than double the normal level immediately after a cold start.

Warming up the engine means more than the engine. The tires, transmission, wheel bearings and other moving parts also need to warm for the vehicle to perform well. Most of these parts do not warm until the vehicle is driven.

Once a vehicle is running, the best way to warm it up is drive it. With computer controlled, fuel-injected engines, you need no more than 30 seconds of idling on winter days before driving away.

The catalytic converter - the device that cleans pollutants from the vehicle exhaust - does not function at its peak until it reached between 750 and 1500 degrees Fahrenheit. The best way to warm the converter is to drive the vehicle.

Idling emits more pollution if the catalytic converter is not working properly. Ask your technician to check the system the next time your car is being serviced.

Driving a vehicle cuts warm-up times in half. This reduces fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

Ten seconds of idling can use more fuel than turning off the engine and restarting it. If you are stopped for more than 10 seconds - except in traffic - turn off your engine.

Every 10 minutes of idling costs you at least 2/10 (0.2) of a gallon of gas - and up about 7/10 (0.7) of a gallon for an 8-cylinder engine. Keep in mind that every gallon of gas you use you produce about 19 pounds of carbon dioxide.

Excessive idling can be hard on your engine. Because an engine is not working at its peak operating temperature, fuel does not undergo complete combustion. This leaves fuel residue that contaminates engine oil and makes spark plugs dirty.

Restarting a car many times has little impact on engine components such as the battery and the starter motor. The wear on parts that restarting the engine causes adds about $10 a year to the cost of driving - money that you'll likely recover several times over in fuel savings.

It‘s important to drive away as soon as possible after a cold start. But avoid high speeds and rapid acceleration for the first 3-5 miles. This lets the whole vehicle reach peak operating temperature as quickly as possible without paying a fuel penalty.

If your vehicle has a diesel engine, idling actually lowers the coolant temperature faster than shutting off the engine. In other words, switching off the engine keeps the engine warm longer

A poorly tuned engine uses up to 15 percent more energy when idling than a well-tuned vehicle. Keeping your vehicle in good condition is a key to fuel efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Idling your vehicle with the air conditioner on (to keep the interior cool) can increase emissions by 13 percent.

Warming up a vehicle is the most common reason given for idling - in both winter and summer! Many drivers also say that they often idle while sitting in the drive-through lane of a fast-food restaurant or while waiting for someone.

Thank you to the Office of Energy Efficiency of Natural

Resources Canada for this information.
Good info thanks a bunch....
 

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HAHAHA. not me personally. king crab taste great tho. my friend's family commercial fishes and they always bring me fresh king crab :biggrin:

Edit: no more jokes about STD's
seriously though you have a civic in Alaska? Do you have to use an oil warmer to keep it from gellin'
 
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