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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've come to the conclusion that my parking brake is quite weak. On a slight incline the recommended 8-10 clicks (according to the sources I have found online and this site) doesn't provide enough bite on the rear discs and the car will roll. I've got into the habit of taking the parking brake to all 18 clicks (fully extended) when parking.

Armed with nothing but online resources and a Sunday afternoon I decided to try and take care of this one myself.

I started by reading this and this thread showing how to remove the center console and adjust the parking brake, respectively.

If you look at the second thread, a DIY on adjusting the parking brake step 3 is defined as Loosen the parking brake adjusting nut (A). A digram is listed.

Below I have linked to an image of my 2007 Civic Si Sedan and what I believed was the parking brake adjusting nut at first glance.



Upon closer inspection it appears as if this nut and corresponding bolt do not control the parking tension. For one, the nut isn't adjustable. Only the bolt as the nut is held in place by it's surroundings. Wording, I know, but odd nonetheless. Picture two below is a side view.



It appears as if that nut and bolt assembly only fasten the plate and teeth that the parking brake ride on to a more sturdy brace. It appears to do nothing for the tension of the parking brake itself. Despite this, I followed the directions. No changes were observed.

The bolt that appears to be used to tighten the parking brake is listed in picture 3 below.



I traced two cables running down between the seats (one to each rear brake, can be seen in picture 1) back to the single cable they merge into (via a small device). This single cable meanders into the shift assembly and I cannot tell where it goes, but it appears to make its way toward the bolt and nut in picture 3.

Just wondering if anyone can second my musings. Service manual will be ordered as soon as they are back in stock. Until then, well...

Thanks in advance.

-Weaver
 

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hmm ive been wondering about this as well, but with all my previous cars.. the adjustment was on the caliper itself. so bump somebody please help
 

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The reason why your brakes don't work anymore is because you overextend it everytime you use it. All I use is 4 clicks or 6 when on an incline and put the shifter in 1st just in case the brakes fail. What you did was stretch your brake cables from pulling too hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
radiocontrolhead said:
The reason why your brakes don't work anymore is because you overextend it everytime you use it. All I use is 4 clicks or 6 when on an incline and put the shifter in 1st just in case the brakes fail. What you did was stretch your brake cables from pulling too hard.
Unfortunately I don't think this is the case. I am not an avid poster, but having been lurking thoroughly since my purchase in July 2007. There are numerous reports floating around this forum of the parking brake on the Si being weak.

While it is true that it may be overstretched as of now I, please tell me what I was to do when I was utilizing the "8 click" recommended range and forgot to put the transmission into first while on a slight incline... and after letting off the main brakes was treated to a rolling back of the vehicle. I did what anyone would do and yanked up a little harder on the parking brake. Not to the maximum but harder than "8 clicks."

After I noticed the roll I started testing the parking brake on other inclines and found it to be quite weak. Unbeknownst to me at the time was the fact that the only thing keeping the car from rolling during many previous parks was the transmission in first.

In order for the parking brake to perform its intended duty on anything over a moderate incline, it takes nearly all of the clicks there are.

Throughout it all, my original question still stands. Is what I am looking at the right bolt to tighten? Or is the setting on the rear calipers?

Thanks.

-Weaver
 

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Yes, I agree with the OP about NOT streching out the brake cables. That sounds ridiculous. I had the same thing happen to me. The parking brake looses it's clamping force over time. At first I would only need 6 clicks, now on a steep incline I need to at least 10 clicks to make sure I don't roll back as well as putting the car in gear. I've already had close calls with what I assumed was a properly applied parking brake.
 

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ha i had my parking brake on. it was about an average pull on it to put it on. i had just got back from work and i took the trash out about an hour later. however the next morning my car rolled down my drive way into my sisters car. causing a hefty amount of damage to my car. you guys are lucky this hasn't happened to you.
 

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What condition are your rear pads in? If they are pretty worn down then putting new pads on would bring the brake back to its original position.
 

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Anyway, it will be the nut that attaches to the cable. I think the one in photo 3 is the one you're after. The other nut you loosened is just the pivot joint for the brake handle.
 

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Don't most cars get their parking brakes adjusted from underneath? I know it can't be that you have to remove the console to do it.

Also, I think it's natural for a car with rear discs to have worse parking brake engagement than one with drums. Because with drums the shoes dig into the drums by themselves as the car moves.
 

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Don't most cars get their parking brakes adjusted from underneath? I know it can't be that you have to remove the console to do it.

Also, I think it's natural for a car with rear discs to have worse parking brake engagement than one with drums. Because with drums the shoes dig into the drums by themselves as the car moves.
Oh you know that do you? Sure...
 

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Brakes work (either hydraulic or mechanical) by applying pressure to a braking surface (drum or rotor) and the amount of braking force is dependent upon the amount of pressure being applied to the braking surface. If a parking brake has to be applied to the limit of its travel, it needs to be adjusted, whether it is a drum or disc parking brake.
 

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Hi,
Flicker appears to have removed your pictures and I would really like to have pictures before starting this project. Could you reupload the images please ?
 
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