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Discussion Starter #1
Ok i know this is a pretty stupid question but I must ask anyway...

If the Si and the RSX have almost the same weight, same engine, similar tranny

why does the rsx-s 0-60 times range from 6.0 - 6.5 and the Si says its 7.5? Is it cause of the LSD ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
tov said the fastest they got it was 6.9 i belive.... that makes me very sad seeing i thought the Si would be the same as the RSX =P
 

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Acorns!
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not a stupid question. I think it's been raised by a few people when they saw the 0-60 and quarter mile #'s. I don't have a good answer really. The Type S does win in the weight category. It obviously loses in the LSD category. The LSD will help the SI, but I think it will make a bigger difference when mods are put on the car - especially forced induction. I think if the same turbo setup was put on the type S and the SI, the SI will walk it because of the LSD advantage. A lot of things determine speed besides the engine and tranny. Even factors such as aerodynamics can play a major role in how quick a cars is - hence = drag.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmm... well I honestly do not plan on slapping on a turbo on my car ever =\ Its way out of my budget. My friend is getting his RSX-S soon and said the day my Si is broken in we'll "have a little race".

I have never raced or anything in my life. I talked alot of smack about how the Si is prob gonna be cheaper than the RSX-S and better tho =P So im gonna have to back up my talk. He then showed me the 0-60 times of the RSX-S and it brought a tear to my eye =P
 

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webby said:
not a stupid question. I think it's been raised by a few people when they saw the 0-60 and quarter mile #'s. I don't have a good answer really. The Type S does win in the weight category. It obviously loses in the LSD category. The LSD will help the SI, but I think it will make a bigger difference when mods are put on the car - especially forced induction. I think if the same turbo setup was put on the type S and the SI, the SI will walk it because of the LSD advantage. A lot of things determine speed besides the engine and tranny. Even factors such as aerodynamics can play a major role in how quick a cars is - hence = drag.
Also, you must consider the fact that the cars were probably tested on different days, with different atmospheric conditions, with different drivers, etc.

AND, LSD's really prove their worth while cornering. A lot of magazines do rolling starts or "street starts" nowadays, eliminating wheelspin froma dead stop and helping non-LSD equipped cars accelerate better.

Anthony "Mario" Crea
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok now i am totally confused on what LSD is..... i thought it helps you during turns not wheel spin (like in burnouts)
 

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Acorns!
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lsd does help stop wheel spin to an extent. It gets the power to the ground - and spins both wheels together. Without the LSD you're basically spinning one wheel. It also helps on auto x stuff in turns etc.
 

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webby said:
lsd does help stop wheel spin to an extent. It gets the power to the ground - and spins both wheels together. Without the LSD you're basically spinning one wheel. It also helps on auto x stuff in turns etc.
A better explaination would be that an LSD distributes torque "from the wheel that slips to the wheel that grips" (to borrow some old Subaru ad-speak). With an open diff, this obviously doesn't happen and the wheel that is receiving no grip is allowed to keep spinning. This is the challenge I will once again face in autocrossing my new 2006 Civic... I had an LSD in my old 93 Civic for the last 3 seasons, and I got very used to it to say the least. I'll have to rely on chassis setup and smart driving to overcome this minor setback.

For straight line launches, it is still possible to spin the tires, just that both of them will spin... Look at Mustangs, Camaros, S2000's, Vettes, F430's, ITR, Cooper S (with LSD option), etc.

Anthony "Mario" Crea
 

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the lsd isn't going to help that much in the drag strip imo...the tires are what matter. The lsd helps in the turns mainly.

I believe the reason the rsx-s is faster is due to the weight and the fact it isn't drive by wire.

And I had a turbo on my ep3 and ran a 13.4 (with the k20a3 at the time), then slapped a quaife lsd in and ran a 13.3 at best (k20a3 at the time)...with cooler weather than the 13.4. I then realized that lsd is more hype when it comes to the striaght line performance...but cornering was great.
 

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Acorns!
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here is an explantion from honda on the TSX's drive by wire -


DRIVE-BY-WIRE THROTTLE CONTROL SYSTEM

An electronic drive-by-wire system helps enhance the driving character of the TSX. With smart electronics connecting the throttle pedal to the throttle butterfly in the intake tract, the engine response can be optimized to suit the driving conditions and to better match the driver's expectations. By eliminating the direct throttle cable connection to the engine, the ratio between pedal movement and throttle butterfly movement can be continuously optimized. This adjustable "gain" between throttle and engine is a significant step forward in drivability.

To establish the current driving conditions, the system monitors pedal position, throttle position, vehicle speed, engine speed, calculated road slope and corner radius and engine vacuum. This information is then used to define the throttle control sensitivity.

From the driver's standpoint (because the drive-by-wire system is combined with other functions such as VSA and Traction Control) this means that the way the TSX responds to throttle pedal movements is tailored to the driving conditions. In stop-and-go driving, the pedal response has low gain and is smooth and progressive for easy driving. A similar low-gain response makes starting out on snowy or icy roads more predictable. In low- to medium-speed driving conditions, the gain increases to improve response and acceleration. In high speed driving, the gain increases further still, so that there's ample response for passing. The system also alters response based on the road slope, providing more throttle gain on uphills, and less on downhills, and also reduces changes in gain on curvy roads to make the car easy to control.

The throttle system works with the available SportShift 5-speed automatic transmission to make shifts faster and smoother than has been possible before. By coordinating the throttle opening with the transmission's shifting functions, engine power can be precisely tailored to the needs of the transmission at every point during the shifting process. That means less shift shock and delay, no matter the driving situation.

The TSX uses a DC motor to control the throttle butterfly position in the intake tract. Large bearings and internal upgrades give the motor greater resistance to vibration.
 
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